What are peoples thoughts on advanced directives?

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I was involved in a very odd conversation tonight about dnr and advanced directives. My mom is a nurse who told horror stories so i really dont believe in keeping someone alive if they wont have a good quality of life. My opinion is is really mean to put someone through that just to pull the plug and i was suprised how many people disagree with that. Im just curious if im odd?

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You are entitled to your beliefs, as others are entitled to theirs.
My husband was on a ventilator for 24 hrs during and after his liver transplant. The ONLY thing he has asked me to "enforce" as far as EOL decisions, is that he NEVER be placed on a vent again. It was so horrible for him, so traumatic, 10 years later he still has panic attacks thinking of it.
Before "modern medicine" the ability to keep someone alive through "hopeless" scenarios was simply not there. Now we can keep someone with zero quality of life alive for years. We can only choose for ourselves, really, and the horror of being with someone who is terminal, but who made no advanced decisions is beyond painful for the remaining loved ones.
My daddy was in the last stages of Parkinson's. On hospice, with as much morphine as he asked for--so basically 24/7 he was being administered morphine. I did it MANY times myself. He'd plead for "more, please, more" and I would give him as much as I could. I felt NO REGRET for aiding my dad's painless passage into the next life. I am a staunch believer in a loving, caring, God. I have not one iota of regret or sorrow for what I helped to bring to pass. I hope when my time comes, my kids love me enough to do the same for me.
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I don't know, my family must be weird or maybe we just had too much faith in the medical profession, but after my father had his heart attack and the doctors said we should remove life support we all just looked at each other and nodded our heads. Nobody thought we should keep fighting, none of us felt the docs were rushing his death, we just excepted the inevitable, shed a few tears, and in a few hours it was over. I just don't get all those posts from people fighting so hard for someone in their 80's or 90's with multiple problems, but I guess DNRs are so necessary today because we have the ability to keep people alive beyond reason.
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There's a huge difference between taking a life and letting someone pass naturally - perhaps as God really intended. I don't recall ever reading of a ventilator in the bible.
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My mom got her Advanced Directive after the Terry Shaivo story, and I am the Proxy. As we went over everything with the attorney I thought how horrible, but I would do as my mother wanted. In April 2009 my brother went into the VA hospital in Philadelphia, he was diagnosed with liver failure, and they were keeping him overnight for observation. That Sunday we got the call my brother was going in for emergency surgery. We were told he would be on a respirator for a few days after surgery. They did take him off the respirator and by the afternoon he was back on it. The surgery was on Palm Sunday...he would take a step forward and three steps back, this went on for weeks..the doctors claimed he could get better, the nurses told us he was very sick. His blood pressure was so low, I didn't know a person could survive like that . My mother wanted to end the care, but doctors insisted he could turn around. Well, now we're into May and no progress, endless infections. We got the call May 19th in late evening to come to the hospital in the morning as they didn't expect my brother to survive much longer. As predicted, we got to the hospital the next morning and the nurse asked what my mom wanted to do, and my mom said to let Eric go. So they cut back the ventilator and gave him Morphine, and he peacefully passed.

At that moment I understood the Advance Directive. If my brother had one, he wouldn't have gone through all that he did.
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I think that we all have choices to make and they are real FOR US AND FOR US ALONE. I want to die without intervention because for me that is my sound of mind choice. I also don't believe in God's will for a whole host of reasons but that too is my choice. If I have it wrong then I guess I fail the exam! It won't be the first but it may well be the last!

One thing I am certain of is this. People can procrastinate all they want but if they think for one second they will change my mind then sorry - aint gonna happen. I respect your beliefs and creeds, your morals and your ethics all I ask is for it to be reciprocated.
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I think the advance directives are very important. For one thing, the healthcare proxy is named and a person can say that they prefer not to be kept alive using extraordinary measures. The advance directives are only executed when the result of continuing life would not be good. For example, CPR might bring them back with broken ribs and a lot of pain, without hope that the heart would continue to beat much longer. The healthcare proxy is allowed to have a say if the final wishes should be carried out when it comes to the dnr. The directives do have a line that the directives should be followed even if the proxy disagrees, but I doubt many hospitals would proceed without agreement -- too risky for them.
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Here is my 'advance directive':
I want to live!
But if I am dying, don't anybody dare call 911.
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Both my parents have/had very, very explicit, detailed Advanced Directives along with your basic pink DNR,s. Dad passed a few years ago and neither came into play. I am my moms health care proxy with a medical and financial DPOA. My mom does not want anything done to revive her or prolong her life - including a feeding tube, which is something I have a personal issue with. I don't consider feeding someone an "extreme" or unnatural measure in keeping someone alive - starvation is not a natural death in my opinion. However my mother has a differing opinion on the matter and I have agreed to - and will see to - that her wishes are carried out.
Remember that controversial case in Florida several years ago? A woman was in a persistive vegetative state - her husband wanted her feeding tube removed - her parents didn't. At the time I told my husband as long as my eyes were open and I could blink he was not to "unplug" me or stop having me fed. Well - after watching both my parents suffering in the past five years - watching old age rob them of everything - believe me, I have since changed my mind. If fact I wish the Death With Dignity laws here in Oregon were a bit more lenient and I would be allowed to peacefully and without suffering end my own life before I have to go through one day of what my parents had to endure for quite some time. But that's just me.
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Sendme - your "advanced directive" reminded me of the informal one my dad had. Daddy had a close friend who was a mountain climbing/ skiing buddy since college - this guy had a bad stroke in his late 60's - left him with the mind of a very confused child and it broke my dads heart. After that daddy use to tell me and my mom "if you ever come home and find me on the floor, turn around, shut the door and go to a movie."
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Rainmom, my brother had a feeding tube while he was recovering from throat cancer, in his fifties. It has since been removed and he eats normally. That, in my opinion, is a very appropriate use of that technology. He had a real chance of recovery and a quality life. His wife and kids and grandkids (and us sibs) are glad he is still with us.

Twice in my husband's 10 years with dementia he was advised to have a feeding tube. He rejected that suggestion. I supported him because even though he had dementia I knew that to be consistent with his views all the years we were married. I really don't think that prolonging life in that way is appropriate for old people who will not recover from whatever is causing them not to be able to eat. My opinion, of course, and that's why I strongly think each person should specific their "opinion" for their own care.
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