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Hey folks, welcome to the new whine/general topic thread. Feel free to use this thread to discuss anything that is on your mind. Caregiving- related stuff, life after a loved one's death, your own emotional wellbeing. Whatever..........anything on your mind.

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Veronica, I hope you're doing better and better. I always appreciate your input about medical matters. I was thinking g-tube meant the peg that they put directly into the abdomen, I didn't know it described the nose tube. Are they both g-tubes??? I'll have to look it up. Edit: after re-reading your post, seems like the nasal type is a temporary g-tube, the abdomen peg is considered more permanent.

I think I remember that my dad couldn't tolerate the nasal g-tube. That was likely why the decision was made to do an abdomen peg in his case.

...

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Vveronica, glad to see you posting, and I hope you are feeling well! If I may ask, as I am just curious, can yone eat Anything by mouth when you have a J-tube, is it an individual decision, or is it the same for everyone?

I remember my Dad having a G-tube (nasal) while in hospital for Aspiration Pneumonia, but it was removed one he was released, but with his disease of PSP (Premature Supranucular Palsy), he had to be on a very strict diet of soft foods and thickened fluids for the rest of his life, and as you can imagine, my very British Father attempting to drink his Life Sustaining Cup Of Tea THICKENED, Ugg, he'd rather drink sour milk! That was the one thing he wouldn't allow us to serve him, he demanded his tea the way he wanted it, so everyone had to be very diligent about sitting near him and monitoring the way he needed to drink small sips, and tilt his head down when swallowing. Unfortunately it was the Aspiration Pneumonia that took him in the end, God Love Him!
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Thanks Veronica
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MsMadge a g tube (naso gastric) inserted through the nose into the stomach is usually a temporary solution to a problem with eating, swallowing or aspiration. They are frequently used after surgery or severe illness when the whole gut has shut down and contents are pooling in the stomach. They can also be used for longer term feeding but are not very comfortable so a tube is usually then placed through an incision in the abdominal wall either into the stomach or directly into the jejunum.
Permanent tubes can provide total nutrition but are more difficult to use and maintain and must be changed at the hospital every three months. Proper care is essentail because they have a tendency to clog easily. Long term feeding can be done at home with competent caregiver.
I have a J tube and can totally manage it myself. You fill a bag with formula by prescription, hang it on an IV pole or similar thread the tubing through a pump, prime the tubing so you done push air in attack to the end of the tube and turn on the pump and it does it's thing over night while you sleep. The important thing to remember is to keep the tube flushed with water before or after feeding because the formula sets up like strands of spaghetti.
This may sound complicated reading it here but multiple lay people have been able to assist me when I was too ill myself. Many nurses are not trained to do this so I have done some supervising when an inpatient.
It is the patient's choice when to do the feedings and it can be done during the day in what is called bolus feeding where you simply pour a measured amount of formula into the tube several times day. For me overnight is the most convenient.
Even with a feeding tube in place aspiration can occur which means the patient needs to sleep at a 30degree incline. No problem for me as I sleep in a recliner.

As far as your friend's DH is concerned I think she made the right decision at the time depending on what his other comorbidities are and his general quality of life. She can always ask them to remove it. It is OK to change your mind this was not a decision that can't be undone.
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I think CM's got it right, and I almost added that part but figured I'd just say "yep, g-tubes come out for good sometimes."

If the cause is a temporary condition, not a progressive decline, I think there's a very good chance that when the person recovers, the g-tube can come out.

I know my dad came home from hospital and rehab stay with his still in place, so that was about 6 weeks of having it. By time he came out of rehab, I don't recall that he was using it anymore. I used to flush it to keep it clean but I don't remember giving him feedings that way. He slowly gained weight and was able to eat soft foods just fine... so then they took the g-tube out and that was in 2014. It's never been needed since.
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😌💦.
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Oh dear, I should have clarified it is not the Viking, but a friend's DH

He had walking pneumonia then vomited and aspirated - was in ICU two weeks with a nasal tube - moved out of ICU but failed the swallowing test and she had to make the decision for feeding tube - he's otherwise showing improvement and getting PT
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Only a guess and not very helpful, MsMadge, but it must depend on what led to the aspiration mustn't it? Temporary cause - someone giving her the wrong food, her being generally under the weather, e.g. - temporary solution. Do you have a real choice about whether to okay it, or anything like that?
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((((madge)))))
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Oh MsMadge ... ((hugs))
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