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I have been living with my 89 yr old mother for 4 months now since she broke her hip, diagnosed with Parkinsons and mild dementia. I want my life back. Today was a bad day and I yelled at her and now I owe her an apology. I feel life just stinks right now and I don't see it getting any better and I'm so tired of everything landing in my lap and my brother and sister don't do much. That's my whine of the day. Any positive suggestions would be most welcome. Thanks.

Great advice already here. I would like to add that the anger and frustration subside a little when you learn how to deal with things. It's still all new. You will learn most importantly that you cannot do this alone! Get help in whatever form is possible.
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To Dana 235
THANKS for sharing. I needed that..
A Caregiver’s Bill of Rights
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Will someone please, please explain to me why people think they are not "good" if they don't let themselves be abused, tormented, have tons of problems and difficulties and heartbreak dumped on them - even at the cost of their own lives and sanities and families. No one on this earth do I know of that MUST, MUST be a caretaker. Some people can do it and do it willingly but they are different than many of us. Other people, for various very valid reasons, simply cannot and should not be caretakers. We are all different. I stick by my concrete beliefs. Do what you can out of love if you had a good relationship; if not, you owe them nothing. But when the bad behavior, dementia with all the related problems starts to impact YOUR life when it is YOUR turn to live life, YOU MUST FIND ANOTHER SOLUTION. Do not let yourself be emotionally, physically and financially ruined. You do NOT deserve that.
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Lostinva 21 hours ago
Thankyou Riley2166. I sure needed to hear that today. Tired of crying in the shower, crying myself to sleep at night due to the verbal abuse from my mom that I’ve experienced all my life & Im now 70!!!
My husband is a good support but nothing like girlfriends that let me cry & rant! I’m on the phone sometimes till midnight with them & it means the world!!
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I'm in the same boat, taking care of my 89 year old mom with Parkinson's. Hiring caregivers during the week helps immensely. Her doctor said she needed the stimulation of someone else to talk to, plus they help with the hardest part, getting her out of bed and cleaned up for the day. One day, sometimes one minute at a time.
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JeanMarie67 Jul 16, 2019
Thank you!
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Bless your heart for living with her. I live next door to my 82 year old mother. Both of my siblings tell me what to do but don't help. I have hired a private caregiver. It has it's own set of issues but it also gives me some relief and down time. My advice hire someone to give you the time you need to recharge. Its not perfect but it helps.
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There is a lot of good advice here. Please get some time for yourself. With caregiving, it never gets easier, only harder as they become more dependent ad their needs escalate. If your siblings don't help they have no right to participate in decisions about her care.

Look into Catholic Charities -- they have volunteer sitters who will do 3 to 6 hours a week and it's only $8 an hour, and you don't have to be Catholic -- they'll help any caregiver. They don't do things like change their diapers, but it will at least give you a little bit of a break.

My nurse practitioner gave me this "Caregiver's Bill of Rights" and told me to read it every day -- this part really jumped out at me: I have the right to
"to seek help from others even though my relative may object...
to protect my individuality and make a life for myself... "

https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver%E2%80%99s-bill-rights
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I feel you. My brother and I have been taking care of my 92 yr mom for seven years. Yes we yell and I have had to walk out into the rain to keep from loosing it. Until I started being part of this forum i felt horrible. Now If I go off, I go off. In a min its over. Sometime she starts crying but that only last a min or two. Use to get really upset over that but I notice she gets over it faster than I do. So all the suggestions are good. Take some of them and just do it. For your peace of mind and her's too. I just keep praying from the moment I lay eyes on her until I leave. My fear is my God will get tired of me. Thanks for listening to me
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JeanMarie67 Jul 16, 2019
Thank you!
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Stop living with your mother.
You move out or move her out.
Do consider, if you do not take care of yourself, you wont have any energy - in any way - physical, emotional, psychological, or spiritual - to care for her, in any way(s) that is best for both of you.

Living together isn't necessarily the best care for her although you may have thought that when you decided to live together; do not be a martyr. You do not have to be a martyr. I don't know where you live. Often financial constants limit a person/family's options. Whatever you decide to do won't be easy nor initially feel good. However, you may very well save your own life and find a quality of life again - wake up in the morning and feel good, being in the moment, appreciating the beauty of the mountains, a tree, or the chipping of a bird, able to laugh again. I would encourage you to see a therapist and get some professional support. Know that your current situation won't get better as your mom declines. You will need to make decisions about the quality of life you want to live. We, here, ALL want YOU to find some peace, comfort and joy in your life.
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lafinbby Jul 14, 2019
Well put....to add to this remember the old adage "if you don't take care of yourself first you won't be able to tale care of (fill in the blank)"
This is SO true. I have to keep reminding myself of it as well, even though it's hard. If I allow myself to get rundown, start having meltdowns too often, eventually I am going to break and end up in the hospital. Who is going to help take care of mom then if I'm not there?
I have to work hard every day at trying to keep a balance between her health and mine. Some days it seems impossibble.
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You are only human and as humans we occasionally have a bad day. However, your yelling at her is a sign that you are stressed by your situation. People have made good suggestions about finding some sort of respite help. Adult day care comes to mind one or two days a week. But in the meantime, look for strategies to lower your stress. Aromatherapy, music that transports you to a calmer or happier place, simply walking out of the room when you need to calm down, exercise, a hobby. Also, are you getting enough sleep? Then, apply as many of these strategies to your mother as well. Let the sun and fresh air into her room and aim to create a happier vibe for her. She's probably feeling stressed too.
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You need respite through an agency like Visiting Nurses, etc. Only then may you be able to catch your breath to carry on with your caregiving duties.
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It is important to get out yourself. Shopping, a class, dinner w a friend, anything to help you get some relaxing me time. Hire someone to stay w her so you have a bit of time. It will do wonders!
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Do not feel bad. With dementia it will all be forgotten. These people with it can just push the right buttons at the wrong time. My mom can be quite the handful. Today I joked with co-workers about mom's favorite obnoxious phrases and envisioned a chatty cathy doll that would produce them when you pulled her string. Like "GET OUT" or "It's STILL MY HOUSE" or WHATEVER I WANT!"

It took me a long long long time to accept that my only sibling would not be of any help.

Call your local area agency on aging and see if they have a family caregiver support program. They may be able to provide some help so you can get out and have a breather.
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I'm sorry to hear your having so much trouble. I would like to help but I'm in the same boat with my 82 year old father. My mother passed away 2 years ago and she did everything. My siblings live in other states and "have their own lives". My husband and I do everything for him. He has had 3 strokes so, we are not comfortable letting him drive so my husband does all the driving and I do all his finances. Example of what my sister did when she came up to visit last month. My father needed to renew his license so, instead of backing us up about his driving she takes him to the DMV. So, now we have to take him to his doctor for him to fill out paperwork before he gets a renewal. I have POA for him and I'm still not going to let him drive though. We argue with him over things and sometimes it drives us crazy. But we do it because we love him and want whats best for him. He lives in his own home with his disable grandson which doesn't help much. We live just a couple miles away and people ask when are we moving in I say I can't because I will go crazy. We do our best and that's all I can do. At first we were so, stressed with no help from anyone. Our own health declined to the point were my husband had a heart attack but were doing better. We're dealing it's not easy. We try to make time for ourselves even if it's one day a week. I hope things get a little better for you. This website is great you know your not alone and people go threw the same things.
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There are MANY of us here who know ALL about that 'whine of the day!' Venting here can help, but keeping your cool can be difficult. You do have to recognize when that bad day stress is getting to you and KNOW to step away. Even if mom needs something, it can wait a little while until you can cool off. Take a breather. Understand we are all human and have our breaking point, so if you do yell, certainly apologize and don't blame her (even if what she is saying or doing leads up to this!)

That said, what is mom's prognosis for the hip? Is she getting any PT/OT for the hip? Dr CAN order in-home PT/OT. While healing, adult day care is not likely to be an option, and respite care in a facility may or may not be doable, but you can start making plans for the future, near and far. The Parkinson's and dementia will progressively get worse. The hip - maybe better, maybe not, you probably have a better idea about that than we do. If you don't think she is healing well or working to get back on her feet, then I would absolutely consider finding her a place to live.

We also don't know her financial situation - has she any assets that can pay for a facility (they aren't cheap!) If not, it might be a good idea to start exploring Medicaid. If her hip is getting better, she might be okay in AL/MC (although the dementia is mild now, moving those patients later from regular AL to AL/MC can be traumatic, so it might be better to start at the MC level.) If you don't think the hip will get better, you may have to consider NH/SNF. BTW, my understanding is that if she qualifies for Medicaid, it can also provide in-home help, freeing you up (I also have read they *could* pay you for being the care-giver, but personally I would opt for them to pay someone else to do it!!!) If she qualifies for Medicaid but there are no beds available, get on the wait list and have Medicaid cover in-home help for her. This will allow you some ME-time and lessen the burden on you.

As for siblings: If you haven't had any in-depth discussions with them, even if it is to just discuss options for mom, you should give this a try. Some siblings just don't realize or understand how hard it is. Those might get a clue if you enlighten them and *may* help in some ways. Others don't want to know and still others don't even care (until it is time to see what is left after the fact.) If you have already tried reaching out and explaining what is needed and they brushed you off, there is no point to stress out about this. You can't change them, only YOUR reaction to their lack of concern/help. There are also many of us in that same boat with you!!! Try to let any anger this causes you to go away - it doesn't help the situation, makes YOU feel worse and does NOTHING to them!

I vented all I had to say to my brothers in an email draft to each, but never sent them. They wouldn't get it, wouldn't accept it, so there was no point to sending them. This did allow me to say what I thought and how I felt and get it out of my system. I did feel much better afterwards and the longer the time passes, the less I think about the emails or my brothers. I know I can't really count on either one for much of anything, so why bother? Think about something more pleasant, not these selfish, boorish, know-it-all dummies! I tell people all the time that I think I got all the brains in the family!!!! ;-)
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If you can’t handle the stress, you can’t handle the stress. That’s no crime. I was in a similar situation, finally the siblings agreed my mother needed more care and stopped fighting on it, mainly because I held a family meeting and said “ you help or she goes into an independent living fact, “ funny how fast that ILF became a reality.
They still have a “ version “ of responsibility , My husband and I do all the medical, including insurance and all dr visits , etc, care of the cat, 90% of follow up with the (now ) ALF including finding the place , ie when she needs TP after she throws her TP away because she’s positive it is wrapping paper, get the 4am phones calls that the cat is “starving” ( not, a woman comes in daily to feed the cat, clean litter since my siblings refused to do it when they visit) etc etc . My brother comes once a week for an hr and my sister writes checks for her credit card and rent and takes her to the hair dresser every three weeks and goes to lunch once with her most other weeks. I’d be dead if I still was doing it all ie cooking for her , running around for her etc, what I’m doing now is barely doable. Moral of the story:
its not going to change for the better, it’s going to get worse. IMO time to get professional help either via a facility( best imo, best medically and socially,) or get caregivers to come . It takes a village to raise an elderly dementia patient .
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Please see if you can hire a caregiver to come in 2 days a week to give you a break. I was a caregiver to my father for 3 years before he passed away. It was rough at times. However, I had to find the money and hire a caregiver which made things much better. I also sent him to a nursing home under the respite program. My sibling was like why did you spend that money there when there was a sibling. However, sibling never came to help do anything and if she did come a day to relieve she wanted to be paid. I could not afford to be paid but she wanted too. I was spending my saving helping my parent as he had limited income. However, the respite home made a deal that if I purchased a week, she gave me a week free. That was the best two weeks to get my life back in order. I knew he was being cared for and I could take care of me. If you do not have family support, or financial resources, look and see what a place for mom can provide. They have people that will help sit and do some tasks so caregiver can get a break. You are being stressed to max when you find yourself getting short tempered or angry at your loved one... Break time... needed. I wish you the best and I hope you find a solution soon to get you some help.
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JeanMarie67 Jul 11, 2019
Thank you very much for your kind response! Very helpful.
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First of all, you have every right on this earth to have your life back - why shouldn't you? This is your time. She lived her life. And why do you feel you owe her an apology - for what? She has medical and mental problems and probably acts out in unacceptable ways. I'd blow up too. Forget that they can't help it, you are human and should not have to put up with that. And the fact that your siblings don't help should tell you something. YOU must take the bull by the horns and make arrangements to either have a caretaker take over or she goes into a facility. No if's on that issue. Just do it. When the negative behavior of someone you are taking care of causes a toll on you mentally, physically, financially, etc., then you are no longer obligated to do anything for them. End of statement.
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It's my husband who has dementia. He's 82 (I'm 8 years younger), has what I call a very "commanding personality" and can be difficult, to put it mildly. I find myself torn between loving the person he used to be, resenting the current situation, and feeling guilty for the resentment. So many times I feel like a prisoner because traveling and socializing have become problematic due to his increasing reclusiveness and unpredictable bad behavior. Fortunately, though, he has not reached the point where he cannot be left alone, and I do manage to take care of me, too -- gym 6 mornings a week, lunch with friends/former co-workers, relationships with children/grandchildren/siblings. And that BIG glass of wine at the end of each day definitely helps!
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Get some kind of respite care NOW. If you are already getting burned out it can escalate quickly. Find an Adult Daycare or look at your state agencies - Health and Human Services/Dept. of Aging. There is also respite care and they can come in to give you a much needed break. You have to take care of YOU - and do not feel like you are being selfish. It's a tough, hard sometimes thankless job. And you are just ONE person! Find something that feeds your soul - movies, books, lunch with friends, yoga, walking, WINE!!!! Keep your sense of humor - it helps!
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Same situation with my mother. I easily get upset with her & end up apologizing. We never had a good relationship, she’s always treated me as if I was in her way, never did anything with me & now she’s in my home & she’s so selfish that I often lose it! She fell again last night, memory is horrible, now needs more assistance dressing, several bathroom accidents a day. Senior daycare has been a blessing, she goes 2 days a week, sometimes 3 if I have something I really want to do or have an appt. I would suggest looking into that through your local council on aging or your county social services. My mom needs LTC, no money for AL. She’s on the waiting list for 8 of them that I’ve visited. It’s absolutely frustrating there’s no beds when you need them. So, a day at a time at my house. Also a brother in another state, phone calls once a week is all she receives from him!
Social Services in your county can be a great resource for you, use them to the fullest. They’ll get you set up for Medicaid, through them you can even get paid to care for your mom. Good luck, keep us posted!!!
I might add that this site has been a good form of support too!
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I’m in the same situation. As when my father passed away my family decided we should move mom back with us on the east coast to live full time with me. And let me tell you I’ve had my struggles, as the main caregiver and living with her full time I experience everything! My sister is here and helps when she can and same with my brother but they both have kids and I always feel like it’s never enough. I mean my mom can basically take care of her self but does not like being alone at all!! Even if I need a break for 2-3 hours out of a 24 hour day she has her freak out. You just need to balance the time you need for your time outs and just chill! I mean obviously make sure she has everything before you pop out but you need “your time” even if it’s for 2 hours where you do what you want to do other you will go crazy!!
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Good advice here.  Do something everyday - if only for 15 minutes - for yourself.  If you can't just take a walk, then lock yourself in the bathroom.  It's amazing what this will do for a reset.  What to do?  Are you a stitcher, reader, music person (listen with an earphone!), card player.  Or outside - a gardener, walker, or just sit and take it all in without interruption.  Long term, suggestions for adult day care and allowing other people in your world would be so therapeutic for you - and maybe her!!.
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I think the hardest thing to deal with in these situations is yourself. I was totally blind sighted and unprepared for my father's Alzheimer's. I had to learn quickly and on the fly. Is it hard work? Oh yes. It's the hardest you will ever have to face. Just when you think things are leveling, WHAM! Next round hits you.
So how can you "live?" Not "lose yourself" or feel like you have to shut-down emotionally to protect yourself? Recognize you can only do so much. Get hired help, Senior day care or living facilities. You have to have breathing time! Listen to music, escape to the movies, get a hobby, exercise - I know both sides. Lord, I was having comfort food pig outs and had to stop, turned to exercise and it's better. You feel physically better and have time to yourself to let your mind calm. Keep a journal, let those feelings vent! Keep up with this site, the information and insight is worth it's weight in gold and you're NOT ALONE!
As for wanting your life back, it will come back eventually, but make sure you don't set yourself up for a massive guilt trip. Okay, you yelled. We all have our moments of regret. Learn from it and bend next time. Once your loved one is gone, it will be the memories of what you did to make their life comfortable to the end that will grow the next chapters of your life.
It's a heartbreaking, thankless task that can overwhelm quite easily being a caregiver. But you can not sacrifice yourself either. Don't rule out counseling, or being frank with your family in asking for help. Reach out to friends for a scheduled girl's night... I hope this helps. Speaking for myself, I've asked the Lord multiple times, why me? It's a tough road to walk on... Apparently I have bigger shoulders than I want. I try to make a joke of it, imagine the size of a new jacket with these shoulders, Joan Crawford would be so jealous. But I try to see the humor. I smell my jar of peanut butter weekly (First things to go can be smell - so if you can still smell peanut butter, you're safe). My family laughs at my production number with the peanut butter jar, trust me.
In short, (too late...) Don't let yourself slide out of control while on this path. Keep yourself close, vent, find something to hold onto and ride the wave. Best of luck to you and take comfort, you are not alone.
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A social worker recommended a local Senior Daycare ($25 Cdn/day) Open 8-6. She had to qualify after an assessment. (Basically needed to be able to take care of her bathroom needs. She is a recent stroke victim, fortunately only short term memory loss & loss of some peripheral vision. But she uses a walker, has cognitive decline and also suffers from OCD which is so emotionally draining)
My mom wasn't "bad off" enough to have someone come in to help to give me an hour or two break. The SW apologized and said assistance she could offer wasn't for me but for my mother.
She then told me about Sr daycare that I had never heard of before.
She just started last week...1 day a week. I get a full day off to myself knowing that my mom is fully looked after by caring staff who are keeping her engaged in activities all day long from exercise, reading, games, social interaction etc.
At least I get one day a week breather for myself, or to be able to work at downsizing my mom without her hindering me.
This particular place has the availability for up to 5 days a week if there is room available.
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This resonates with me so much. I took on increasingly hard work caring for my elderly parents over the last 10 years of their lives. My advice is to get help. It’s too much. I found myself wishing my mother would hurry up and die. I still feel guilty about that but we do the best we can. I don’t know if money is the issue or not but you cannot do this yourself. There are ways she can qualify for Medicare to pay. She has to be poor on paper. Look into it and take care of yourself.
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OMG...I am in the exact same position with my mom & 2 siblings. Flew across the country to do this & now trying to prepare for move/downsize for her with almost no family assistance. And add hoarder to the list so purging is a nightmare.
Looking forward to responses as well. I was about to post similar vent & wasn't sure what to say...
Thank you for your timely post & good luck in your circumstances
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As they say, now the shoe is on the other foot. Now you have insight into why your parent(s) yelled at you when you were growing up.

Yes, I am guilty of yelling at my father when his actions frustrated me. Then I thought to how I felt when I was yelled at. I went back and apologized and from then on I allowed my father to do things his own way. I only asked him to let me know if things didn't work and together we would find a solution.

I assisted my father for 7.5 years after Mom passed - and never had problems after I realized "the shoe was on the other foot."
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It has only been 4 months and already you are burned out. I would have a family meeting and discuss with brother and sister options for your mother. I do not think you will be able to handle taking care of your mom alone. I feel sad for both you and your mother but she has serious health issues and you want what is best for her. She needs more help than you can provide. Wish you and your mother the best.
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make your apologies and go on from there. have a conversation with brother and sister. as long as you take on the role of caregiver they will be willing to step back and let you do it. plan what help you need, grocery shopping, rides to doctors visits, time off for a few hours to yourself. then present these to your brother and sister ask/tell each what their involvement in mom's care will be.

remind them the alternative is to employ home care aides. each of you would need to share the cost of such help.
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Lots of good answers here - the theme being that you are struggling and need to make a change for both yourself and your mom. While I didn't live with my mom, I was her primary caregiver for over 5 years. It never got better, it just got more and more time consuming and was a constant worry for her safety. I began referring to the "crisis du jour" as there seemed to be one every day. She is now in Memory Care after trying other options like in-home help, etc. I can go there and visit as her daughter and not her caregiver. I will get a call from them if there's something that needs my attention but if she is a little off or dizzy, I know someone else will have eyes on her first. She's been in Memory Care for three months and I still have PTSD but I can tell it's getting better. I won't sugar coat it, making a decision to move someone is heartbreaking and difficult. I just tried to focus on her safety and our collective mental health and am so glad we seem to be through the hardest part now. I wish you the best - you've come to the right place for support here.
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Ree111 Jul 11, 2019
Well said!
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