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And in some cases, actually try to take more than their fair share of the inheritance? I'm assuming this is because of their low character in general. What's your opinion? In addition, you've heard the saying that there are two things in life that are for sure; death and taxes. Well, here's a third one that is for sure in life; no-help siblings always come back bigtime, when it is time to collect the inheritance.

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Thanks everyone, as all of the answers are very helpful!
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There's always one in every family. I have the greediest sister you can imagine, and never knew it until my parents got sick. My sister did absolutely nothing to help with the care, but managed to constantly complain about the money being spent on it. (My other siblings and I knew it was because she was trying to preserve as much of the inheritance as she could.) She took all of my mom's valuables after she passed away, systematically removed anything of value my dad had in the house, and almost convinced him to buy her a "retirement condo" (which would have been the entirety of the estate ALL going to her) until he accidentally let the cat out of the bag (because of his dementia). Then when caught in the act, she saw absolutely nothing wrong with it and somehow became the victim. I've never known anyone more shameless or greedy, and unfortunately, this person is a member of my own family.
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Yep, I've seen all it all. It is sad, but that is life, I guess. I'm not terribly helpful, but it's life.
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Yep, seen it before. It's unfortunate those that protest the most want nothing to do with the actual work but want to reap the rewards. Make sure your parents have their affairs in order, they can see an attorney for that, this way siblings can't say you have influenced the parents. It's a shame they don't want to help, but I see it all the time. Some people just don't have the character or just can't deal with aging parents as it brings to light our own mortality. You can contact the local Area Agency on Aging or bureau of senior services, they may be able to give you a list of local attorney's. They also have programs that your parents may be eligible for that could help with their caregiving.
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My mother in law always said "The dog with the dirtiest tail wags it the most."
She also said if she had a dime left, she was going to swallow it.
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This is a fear of mine. I moved to be near my mom over 30 years ago. She is now living with my husband and I to our delight! My closest sibling lives a days drive away and uses that as an excuse for not seeing her but once a year if she's lucky. The flight is only11/2 hr and is not out of reach financially.
My mom made me DPOA and executrix of her will and has sold her house and opened a savings account for me with the money that she is getting as she(we) are holding the mortgage. She also has some additional savings which she has money deposited from this account yearly into another account with both our names on. She has decided that we should build an assist ion on my house so that she has more room. I don't have the money to do that since I retired to be with my mom.
I am concerned that my brother and step brothers may resent the money that is being given to me, but none of them have changed their lives to accommodate her and keep her from moving into assistive living.
It bothers me a bit because I have heard my brothers complain that I am spoiled all my life because I am the youngest and the only girl in my family and my stepfather's. He has since passed away. I am also the one who expresses more love concern and interest.
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I SO SO SO know exactly what Whitney means in this question. One of my siblings had the lightest shifts and she called me long distance complaining about how long it was taking to get my parent's bank account dissolved.
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When sig other was putting together his new Will/Trust, his daughter called up telling him to make sure that so-and-so won't be in the Will.... because of that he lowered his daughter's percentage, and every time she called again to tell her Dad what to put in the Will, the percentage kept going down :P

Actually sig other shouldn't have said squat that he was updating his Will to her in the first place. She's isn't going to be the Trustee nor have POA, so it's none of her business.
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I told my father to spend every last nickel or someone would be fighting over it. When he turned 80 I wrote a Will for him that made sure none of us got any of his estate. Not a penny. It all went to his third wife, who waited on him hand and foot for 24 years. I still get a chuckle over that.
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