Is it possible to name 4 siblings as power of attorney so they may do things independently for their mother? - AgingCare.com

Is it possible to name 4 siblings as power of attorney so they may do things independently for their mother?

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There are 4 of us and we work well together, however we do things separately to lighten the work load. each of us will need the poa from time to time. we are in the state of georgia.

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My sister and I both have POA for our mom. It's worked only because we have had an understanding that whomever our mom currently lived with called the shots. The other was there for support and brainstorming.

But getting four people to agree as time goes on will be like herding cats.
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Usually I quote movies. This time I'll use an old saying "Too many cooks in the kitchen spoil the broth".
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Four POA's would be a mess and would be a major hurdle when the time comes to use it.

Pick names out of a hat, draw straws, whatever you need to do. But keep it to 1 person.
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I can not even imagine 4 people doing this and all agreeing! I am an only child and I doubt my self sometimes! And hubs and his brother cant agree on anything.... don't do it!
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Even though you all get along well POA split four ways will be a mess. Mom has to be competent to assign POA. Pick one sib and have others as contingents. Things may be going well now but as time goes on eldercare gets tougher and someone has to be in charge. Use consensus decision making to guide POA sib.
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You need to talk to Georgia Eldercare attorney.

My mom appointed one brother PoA and all three of us are Health Care PoAs. Youngest brother always says " i trust you guys".

In one instance, a couple of years ago, mom ( vascular dementia from a stroke, chf, occadional pulmonary issues) developed a heart problem that could be fixed by a pacemaker. I argued against it; 20 years ago, my mother made it clear to me that she would not like to live how she is living now. But she is not incompetent, and asked by us if she wanted the pacemaker, she said yes.

Just understand that at some point, there WILL be disagreements and you'll have to work to resolve them.
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