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He starts opening car door before car is stopped. He pushes in a crowd to get through. He carry’s his head very forward and leans forward when walking. He walks as if he is trying to get his feet to keep up with the forward momentum of head. This gait is more prominent in the house without a cane than outside with a cane. He has never been like this before.

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If the mobility problems are related to Parkinson's or dementia, the broken brain has removed filters or warning signals that it's an unsafe or rude behavior. My MIL doesn't recognize any more that it's unsafe to enter/exit elevator if doors are closing....
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My mom was the same way. She was always in a hurry and it caused many falls when her body would move faster than her brain would. As for the car, put him in the backseat and engage the child-proof locking system. “Dad! Slow down, I can’t keep up with you!” might work. A smile and an apology to people he pushes out of the way could help too. Or walk in front of him and “run offense” to use a sports term.
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DaughterDebbie1, some people are just in a hurry, want to be first out of the car, first in line, first in front of a crowd, etc.

As for the walking leaning forward... I had noticed with my Mom, who use to walk very straight, once she started to use the cane she was bending over. Thus, without using the cane, she still had that bent over appearance as she walked. Her spine was twisting.

My own Dad never developed that bent over position as he went to using a rolling walker quite quickly, preferring that over the cane. I believe with the walker, people tend to stand up straighter than using a cane, so their spine will stay straight.
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