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Rather than reply to the original comment, where it might get lost, I'm posting this as a new comment. This is in regards to "locking" your SSN via the E-Verify.

I was aware of this "tool", to be used by employers to verify that you were legally eligible to be employed in the US. I was not aware that we could do something with it. HOWEVER, this morning I read an article about this very "method.":

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2020/07/e-verifys-ssn-lock-is-nothing-of-the-sort/

You can read it yourself for the details, but it appears that this is more than useless for "locking" your information. The author was able, using a different email and server, to set up a second account and unlock it.

I would NOT recommend using this tool. FREEZE credit through the 3 major credit bureaus to prevent anyone using an SSN to open new lines of credit (CCs, mortgages, loans, etc.), prevent someone using it to rent/buy and/or secure employment.

Please note that freezing your credit does NOT protect existing accounts. You would need to contact each provider to address the compromises.
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Reply to disgustedtoo
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TinaTravis: The Social Security Fraud hotline phone number is 800-269-0271.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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If you have POA you can put a freeze on their credit.

that’s what I did for my moms SSN.

one of the three credit agencies I had all the pertinent information and I was able to do on-line or over phone. I don’t remember which so much stress and problems and issues. The other two required copies of POA.

If they don’t have their SSN memorized perhaps you can confiscate their SS cards.

in addition if it does not cause to much extra work or problems change their land line to an unlisted phone numbers.

Good luck.
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Reply to Usedup1959
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Frances73 Sep 27, 2021
Yes, you can go online to the "Do Not Call" registry and add their phone number. It might not stop every call but might help cut down on some.
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In addition to telling the credit bureaus, tell Social Security at once.
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Reply to Riley2166
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disgustedtoo Sep 27, 2021
"no one is that stupid"

Given that in the past EVERYTHING you had to do required giving that SS#. It was never intended to be used for anything other than SS, but in the past, school/college, insurance (home/car), doctor offices, hospitals, virtually EVERYONE used SS# in some way. It was only when hackers became more prevalent that this became an issue. Certainly we are told not to give it out, but give me a break!!! It is more a case of being trusting and because this is the way it was done for SO long that people get taken.

As far as being stupid, as I noted in another comment, the woman at the EC atty office sent my SS# via email, asking me to confirm it so she could finalize the trust being set up for my mother. AN ATTORNEY'S OFFICE!!!! Even when I called and chastised her for this, she was clueless and said it was all fine. She's obviously not "stupid", but she IS clueless.

Throw in some cognitive issues and we have a recipe for disaster. Despite what YOU think of those with dementia, THEY CAN'T HELP IT anymore than the fact that you can't walk.
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Call Social Security to inform them and make sure your Bank is told not to release any cash from Bank Accounts without you being present.
Also you can ask to be notified on any new bill payments
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Reply to bevthegreat
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Here is a government website to lock her SSN: https://www.e-verify.gov/mye-verify/self-lock

I locked my husband’s after he gave his number to scammers. I locked mine too. Also, most credit and bank cards have phone apps that allow you to flip a switch that locks your card down so no one can use it. I keep mine locked until I’m about to use it, then I relock it immediately.
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Reply to Jsaada5757
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disgustedtoo Sep 27, 2021
That is a new one for me, but in addition their credit info should be frozen via the credit bureaus. The e-verify won't prevent thieves from using SS # to open new credit, rent/buy, etc.

Also note that the freeze doesn't protect existing accounts. Each should be contacted to report the issue (banks, credit cards, investments, etc.)
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When did you/they find out?

Scammers could immediately apply for credit cards as soon as they had the numbers
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Reply to Cover99
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I would also contact SS directly and advise of the potential theft and ask to start the process for changing their SS numbers.   Notify the bank at which their monthly SS funds are deposited as well.     I don't know offhand how SS payments are made when fraud is involved, but it's best to find out now, as in today.

I searched for a "not responsive declaration" that used to be possible, haven't found info, but did find this very good outline for action:

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0213-lost-or-stolen-credit-atm-and-debit-cards

Another source with helpful information:

https://www.bankrate.com/finance/credit-cards/your-rights-in-case-of-fraud/
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Reply to GardenArtist
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https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-2015/cheap-ways-to-avoid-identity-theft.html

Best information I find is on the AARP pages. If you are their POA you can likely freeze their credit so that Social Security number won't allow anyone to apply for credit using their names. You can also place fraud alerts with TransUnion, Experian and the Equifax agencies.
There will be other information out there when you google "Identity Theft Protection". So sorry that this happened.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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Isthisrealyreal Sep 22, 2021
You can do this online without DPOA.

It should be done pronto since SS#s have been handed out. It should include a fraud alert.
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I am not sure what you can do. With my MIL she gave out her bank acct# and realized what she did as soon as she hung up. She called her bank and they froze her acct.

I would freeze their credit cards. Call the bank. Call Social Security. Ask all of them if there is some kind of Security guard thing you can join now to track the SS and get an alert when someone tries to open an acct with ur parents SS#s. Their Credit Cards, may have that feature.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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disgustedtoo Sep 27, 2021
As others and I noted, freezing your credit with the 3 major credit bureaus is the best way to handle this initially. You won't need any credit monitoring (the ones that have been provided to me in the past when someone out there made mistakes were useless!) This prevents anyone using their info to open new accounts, rent/buy, get loans, etc. It will NOT protect any existing accounts.

Additionally, contact banks, investment companies, credit card companies, insurance, etc and report this. They should have ways to "manage" it. Contact SS via the local office and report it there too - they should be able to advise you.
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Contact all three credit companies immediately and freeze their credit. Don't lose the password they give you in order to unfreeze it.

Also send a letter to each agency telling them the numbers have been scammed, and that your parents have not authorized any credit or loan applications. (These letters have to be signed and the freezing done by your parents, but of course, the freezing can be done online, so you can do it, and you can write the letters/emails for them.)

If your folks aren't likely to be getting a new credit card or a loan anytime soon, you may never have to unfreeze it. I froze my parents' credit in 2018 and never changed that status.

*Remember to do it for each SS#. They have separate credit profiles.
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Reply to MJ1929
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KaleyBug Sep 27, 2021
I froze mine about 5 years ago and have not needed to unfreeze yet.
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