Frauds & Scams - AgingCare.com
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Frauds & Scams

Wrongful or criminal action intended to result in financial or personal gain.
  • There are a few important steps that you must take after your identity has been compromised, but there are also a couple of roadblocks to avoid and minor details to be aware of when you are going through this process.
  • Con artists can more easily manipulate someone in person, so they often approach seniors at home under the guise of offering some kind of service. Learn from these real-life examples and use these tips to avoid falling victim to a scammer.
  • Identity theft is a serious issue that everyone is at risk for. Some specialized companies claim to protect their subscribing customers from data breaches and compromised identities, but are they really that effective? Can't you just monitor and safeguard your financial and personal information yourself?
  • Countless businesses and organizations are targeted by hackers every year, leaving consumers vulnerable to fraud. Use these steps to protect your identity and finances.
  • Using snail mail, writing checks, and placing all refuse in the garbage are a few traditional ways of managing finances and household affairs. While these may seem like simple and secure everyday actions, it is important to learn how these things can place you at risk and how to adapt your habits to better protect your identity.
  • Scammers have adopted a new strategy for manipulating caller ID in order to persuade people to answer. Knowing what kinds of suspicious signs to look for can help you to avoid people calling with shady intentions.
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  • The term elder abuse encompasses a wide array of mistreatment of the elderly. Learn the warning signs, laws, and what to expect if you need to report a suspected case of risk or harm to an older person.
  • A new, nationwide elder abuse analysis has led to a surprising conclusion that could cause older Americans to think twice about trusting their money to those nearest and dearest to them.
  • Elder abuse can be difficult to detect and investigate, so family members must be attentive to their aging loved ones’ financial health. If you believe a senior is being exploited, act quickly and use the proper channels to file an official report.
  • Elderly people are often targets for robbery, purse snatching, pick-pocketing, car theft, or home repair scams and other forms of abuse. Here is some advice for your senior parents to help them avoid becoming victims.
  • There are five basic types of elder abuse: physical, sexual, psychological, financial and neglect. If others are involved in providing care for an elderly loved one, be aware of the potential for elder abuse and how to identify it.
  • Mobile devices and social media platforms have provided a number of benefits to society, but these tools have also made it easier for unsavory people to exploit vulnerable individuals, such as the elderly and those with dementia. Learn more about this prevalent issue and see how you can prevent your loved one from becoming a victim.
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  • Adding this one simple step when a loved one creates or changes their will, powers of attorney and other crucial legal documents can minimize unnecessary stress and familial discord down the road.
  • Family caregivers work tirelessly to ensure their loved ones’ health and happiness, but many don’t realize that there’s a legal component to their role. Without these crucial healthcare documents, you may not be able to help when your elder needs it most.
  • Familiarize yourself with the basic legal documents and forms that seniors and their caregivers use to create cohesive legal, financial and medical plans for the future.
  • There are many different legal and financial tools that can be used for Medicaid planning, estate planning and tax planning purposes. A living trusts are one popular option, but it is important to know how this tool works and make sure this is the best fit for your assets, personal situation and goals.
  • Many adult children and caregivers are concerned about how their parents' debts will be handled once they pass. For parents who are in long-term care facilities, there may be some states where children might be responsible for their bills.
  • Some individuals may consider transferring property to a trusted family member as a part of their estate plan or Medicaid planning. However, there are a few different scenarios to consider before opting for such a strategy to ensure you do not lose the property altogether.
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