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Mom has been losing thinking abilities for last several years, just lately her new thing is she remembers a name, but doesn't know why she remembers that name or who the person is. I then tell her and she says, "do you see what I'm doing all the time?" So she is aware that it is a problem. This seems to me like a step up in her forgetfulness. Should I take her to someone for evaluation at this point? Her GP is her "wonderful doctor" whom she loves a great deal, but every time I take her to see him, he walks out and says, she's great, no dementia at all. And she does perform well with him. He has given her the mini-test for dementia which she did OK on several years ago. Can anyone recommend who else I could get her to go to or how I should handle this?
And here's the big question: Are there any meds that would help with this decline in either demenia or alzheimers? I can't seem to get a straight answer to that one.

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I think that getting a diagnosis is important because all cognitive decline is not dementia and all dementia is not Alzheimer's - there are also medications that could help slow the progression in the early stages. I'm going to link some articles for you to read:

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/people-with-alzheimers-not-told-their-diagnosis-179411.htm

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/alzheimers-dementia-testing-149186.htm

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/alzheimers-disease-diagnosis-and-treatment-108286.htm

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/early-diagnosis-of-alzheimers-is-crucial-for-effective-planning-and-treatment-432873.htm
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Reply to cwillie
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Make sure that you have all the paperwork in order while her doctor is clear that she is still competent - will, POA, HIPPA, end of life directive etc. This is a wake-up call.

I hope that someone who knows will tell you about drugs. My memory is that there is something that may delay progression if taken in the early stages, but no guarantees.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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An appointment with a neurologist would seem appropriate at this time. They will be able to give her a series of tests and perhaps even suggest an MRI. The "family doctor" may be uncomfortable with having to tell her or you that she may have cognitive decline. I really urge you to make a neurology appointment so that you know exactly what you are dealing with. It is in your mother's and your best interests.

I know from experience how difficult all of this is. Good luck.
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Reply to Sanibel01
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