Is anyone familiar with mild cognitive impairment?

Follow
Share

My husband is 17 years older than I am. He was recently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. He also has type 2 diabetes. He has become very mean and grouchy towards me. Blames me for everything. I am his only caregiver and I work full-time. Any suggestions on trying to deal with mood swings or MCI would be great!

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
3

Answers

Show:
And when you become Canonized for  saint hood for some how not getting upset with being asked the same question 5 times in 10 minutes , please let us know how that works. Sorry just kidding. It’s hard. My mother was diagnosed with MCI with amnesiac features in August 2016 by a neuropsychologist. About 2 months later, her PCP diagnosed her with dementia and prescribed aricept. A few months after that, her dr said dementia was worse . When I directly asked if this was Alzheimer’s, her response was “ I don’t know”. What I have noted , is she is really in her own world. Remembers the past. Zero short term memory. Has no interest in anything except the news. Extremely dependent on me.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I agree with what Eyerishlass posted to not correct him if he gets details wrong about something or searches to find the correct wording. I'd also add to not push him to learn new tasks that require a lot of focus such as a computer game, do not try to "fix" his decline by forcing him to read, and do not tell him " I already told you that" when he asks repeated questions. Doing any of this will frustrate him and escalate the tension. I know because I am living it with my parents right now. Some things you can do is try to let the "small things" roll off your back, find a local support group to talk to other caregivers who understand (I've done that), and get a large calendar to write down important appointments and events to help keep organized. Also, keep focused on your work and doing things that give you peace.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Mild cognitive impairment falls between the decline of normal aging and dementia. Someone with MCI may never progress to dementia but their MCI doesn't really improve either.

Has your husband's doctor put him on an anti-depressant and/or an anti-anxiety medication? If not you might want to discuss these medications with his doctor.

The main caregiver always gets the brunt of the bad moods and ill temper. Everything gets taken out on the caregiver. You can try to discuss this with your husband but he's not liable to understand.

There are a few things you can do to maybe make things easier. Don't correct him. If he's getting the date wrong or is remembering something wrong don't point it out to him. If he believes something that you know is not true don't disagree with him, just be noncommittal and let it go.

Is he safe at home alone while you're at work? You might want to begin thinking about in-home help for when you'll need it.

Let friends and family know about your husband's condition. You may have to call on them for support or respite so you don't wear yourself out caring for him.

And come back here and vent as much as you need to.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.