Behavior Change - AgingCare.com
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Behavior Change

Transformation or modification of a person's activities.
  • People in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia often live in an altered reality. Validating a loved one’s perceptions via “therapeutic fibbing” is the kindest, most respectful way to handle hallucinations and delusions.
  • Watching a loved one progress through the stages of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias can be a heartbreaking experience. Learn more about short- and long-term memory recognition and the stages of the disease to be more prepared and have realistic expectations.
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ insights on sundowning that occurs at other times of day, like “sunrising.”
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best tips for keeping a dementia patient calm and engaged.
  • Mum hasn’t been herself lately, and it’s been weighing heavily on my mind. Perhaps something is wrong with her medication regimen, or it could be what I dread most: her Alzheimer’s disease is progressing.
  • I see Mum fading in and out of reality, sometimes recognizing the severity of her illness and other times not even realizing something is wrong. All I can do is go through the motions with her.
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  • While Alzheimer's disease and dementia progress differently in each and every person, it is important for both the patient and their caregiver to remember that a diagnosis isn't an immediate death sentence.
  • The way we deal with difficulties and failures says a lot about how we live our lives. But when these things are caused by something out of our control, like dementia, should we just accept our limitations or fight them tooth and nail?
  • So many people consider sharing a diagnosis publicly to be an act of courage. Yes, this does help to lessen the stigma against diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia. But are we making too much of this simple deed? Shouldn't we all be able to share our true selves without fear of abandonment or embarrassment?
  • Cognitive decline is difficult to definitively diagnose, but like other diseases, it can be awkward to talk about this elusive prognosis. Most people don't wish to get detailed updates on others' health, but assumptions can be especially frustrating.
  • Memory loss, difficulty solving problems and confusion are a few of the signs that may indicate various types of cognitive impairment or a form of dementia. Our parents and grandparents cared for their families and this is when relatives and caregivers can begin helping them. Consulting their physician and being proactive with diet, rest and exercise are among the top areas in which they will need encouragement and assistance.
  • A recent reading of "Flowers for Algernon" has helped me realize that my journey through cognitive impairment does not have to include the culturally-expected suffering.
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  • When both elderly parents have dementia it's a very difficult situation. Seek your doctor's advice to find out about new medication that might control their agitation and verbally abusive behavior.
  • Seniors with urinary tract infections usually don't exhibit the textbook symptoms that younger people do. Instead, confusion and sudden changes in behavior are the tell-tale signs of a UTI.
  • Alzheimer's and dementia often cause difficult behavioral changes that can easily become dangerous for both patients and their caregivers. Notifying the local police and EMS of your loved one's condition can help them better handle potential emergencies.
  • Although elderly and disabled care recipients are vulnerable to abuse and exploitation, family caregivers can also be targets of verbal and physical mistreatment. What can a caregiver do when they are being victimized by their patient?
  • It's difficult for me to accept the personality changes that I may experience as my disease progresses. I'm worried about the future of my relationships, but addressing the issue head on is my best bet for gaining ongoing support.
  • Cognitive decline can cause a number of different emotional and behavioral issues that are especially challenging for caregivers. Sometimes the best option for reducing a patient's anxiety, depression, or combativeness is medication.
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