Follow
Share

My father is 95 and has advanced stage dementia. Sometimes he sleeps for two days, other times he is up all night rearranging things. A new development is that he takes off all his clothes in bed and removes the sheets from the bed. He fights me when I try to get him cleaned up. Not even the caregivers can touch him sometimes. I am at my wits end. We have a new caregiver coming tomorrow. I hope that she will be able to handle him.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
YES!these behaviors are common my Aunt needs a schedule I try so hard to keep her on one but at night she's up flossing her teeth, or rearranging papers ,just fiddling around her room ..so I started going in around 8pm to give her the pajamas &suggest she gets to bed early because she was soooo sleepy today ,mostly she chews me out and says to mind my own business, and calls me a liar !! LOL hahaha I love it she's so MEAN sometimes ..so then I leave for a few minuets ,when I go back,to suggest a early bedtime, she's nice as can be ,LOL,HAHA!! This is not the case with everyone..GOOD LUCK hope you can get a schedule that works maybe your dad needs some Lorazapam for the night time before you lose your mind
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Some medicines will cause those symptoms too. Only your physician can judge. But you can look up the side-effects of all her medications. I know one makes you do all you describe. Sorry, I don't know what it is, only that it does it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Perhaps the new caregiver will be able to control the LO because right now the LO is calling the shots. However, do not be surprised if nothing changes. And why? Because the elderly LO is set in their ways, possibly very stubborn and resistant to change. I would, however, get a medication reassessment done by his doctor to see if something's amiss.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Yes, erratic behaviors are part and parcel of dementia. Sleep disturbances are very common in some kinds of dementia. Not everyone has the same symptoms as your father, but he is by no means unique.

Discuss his new behaviors with his doctor, especially any behaviors put him or family members at risk. Who is up with him, for example, when he is up all night? Try to resolve any safety issues and to be patient and reassuring with behavior that is just strange but not hurtful.

There is adoptive clothing available that fastens in the back and is difficult for the wearer to remove. This helps prevent nursing home patients from wandering the halls naked. In his own home you may have a lesser need for dad to keep his clothes on all night, unless he gets excessively cold or it is very unsettling to the rest of the household. But if need be, take other member's advice about trying clothes he might enjoy wearing more, or as a last resort clothes he cannot take off. 

Dementia involves damage in the brain. Our brains control all aspects of our bodies, and damage in the brain can impact pretty much anything. That includes our sensations of temperature, how things feel against our skin, our internal clocks that tell us when and how long to sleep, how we perceive pain, and the list goes on and on. Yes, your father's unusual behavior is caused by his dementia.
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

My grandma loves blankets too and to rip apart her chair where she spends her days. She will fold her blankets even if she's 'cold' just because she claims she has to. I have found flannel sheets and heavier blankets help as she removes the cotton ones saying they are wet (which in reality they are just a tad bit colder than flannel sheets). She will pull on her blankets claiming she's 'sewing'. She takes walks saying she's 'going home.' She rearranges her area where she sits all day lots of times during the day. We try to work around it.

We haven't had the clothes issue yet but she hates to have her clothes off. It's a terrible chore in the morning to get her undressed to be cleaned then undressed at night to have her clothes changed again. She gets very upset and fights me at night to the point of where I end up distracting her in some manner just to get the job done. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn't. it's just part of the disease I think. I have given my grandma a little basket full of trinkets. She loves it. There are things to sort and lay out on her table, little tiny books to look at the pictures in, a pencil and paper for her to think she's at school and taking notes, a few hair things in there for her to mess with, and various little toys for her to organize. She takes these things out of the basket, does her little thing with them, then puts them back in. It's a break from the routine. I have sometimes the great grand-children of her look at photo albums with her to distract her from her day. I have found though routine is huge and helpful when dealing with her. Perhaps as suggested above, a routine will help you out as well.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

They can do that. Maybe the caregiver can get him on a schedule that makes the day less confusing to them. My mother, who is in a medium stage of dementia has gotten into the habit of pacing the house, stripping the bed twice a day, and rearranging the fridge. I try to keep her active by taking walks. You may also try changing the type of sheets he sleeps on or the clothes they used to wear around the house without a problem. Sometimes they don't like the feel of it on their skin. Maybe you can see if he prefers something comfortable or slip on for clothes, and changing the type of sheets he sleeps on to either something crisp or softer, depending on what he likes
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.