My in-laws are always complaining about the cold. Is there a playbook I can borrow to learn how to keep us both comfortable?

Follow
Share

Stop the thermostat wars. My in-laws are always complaining about the cold, sometimes turning the AC unit off in the summer when it's near 100 degrees outside. I have let them know it's ok to turn up the unit when I'm at work so they don't freeze (today's claim) but I am breaking out in heat related hives and can only take off so many layers of clothing. Must I retreat to my bedroom and sweat under the ceiling fan? Is there a playbook I can borrow to learn how to keep us both comfortable? I know it's harder for them to be warm, but they have blankets, throws, jackets, hoodies, etc. why must I overheat to the point of nausea?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
25

Answers

Show:
1 2 3
We use a space heater and heated blankets for my mom.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Is your house zoned or all on one thermostat? My parents house was all on one and I left a set of summer clothes in my old closet for when I visited. I also kept the door to the room closed and during the winter the vents almost closed. When we built our house we set up each bedroom as a separate zone and another zone for the general living area. When Mom visited we turned the heat up slightly in the common area but also told her to bring extra layers. We also have several blankets available on the couches to cover up with if you get cold.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Get an electric throw blanket. I saw one at Target for $35 this week.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mother is always cold too, and hubs and I are hot. We got those Amish heaters .. she has one in her TV area, and she runs a space heater in her bathroom when she is in there. Not perfect.. but better than nothing!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

What I would do is if this is your house, put the AC on the coldest setting and send them to another room. Some people cannot deal with the heat whereas others cannot deal with the cold either so they should look at other living arrangements if they're living with you. If they're just visiting, then tell them to go home if they can't take the cold but you're not going to have a heat stroke just to make them happy. Hide the remote or just keep it with you but don't let them cause it to be hot in your house and risk your health. I have heat related issues myself and my doctor has since prescribed me to have an AC due to my unique condition. I would not have anyone living with me if they could not be where it must be kept cool. If they are just visiting they can go but my place must be kept cool during summer. Therefore, in your situation you're going to have to put your foot down and be firm with these people. If your doctor happened to have prescribed AC for you, then if the in-laws can take it, oh well! If they don't like it, they can leave and you can show them where the door is an even hold it open for them, then slam it behind them on their way out
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Playbook rules:
The elders could, quite likely, be cold because of the meds they take (think Coumadin, for one). Or they're cold because the body is not is motion.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

The main problem is their circulatory system is not functioning the way it used to.
As a person ages, and this becomes more pronounced as they decline, the body strives to keep the "important stuff" warm. That is the core and the brain. so the extremities do not get the circulation that they used to. So hands feel colder, feet feel colder then arms and legs.
If the person is mobile one of the electric throws works very well. There are problems if the person is not mobile leaving a heating pad, heating blanket or any other source like that can lead to burns. Again since the circulation is so poor it is difficult to tell when an area becomes too hot.
If this is not possible I found that the fleece type pants and tops helped a lot. And they are easy to wash and dry. (Do NOT use a fabric softener on any of the fleece type products.) They do keep you warm. And when it comes to it you may have to resort to hats, even in the house this keeps the top of the head warm where a lot of heat is lost and it keeps the ears warm, another body part that feel cold as circulation declines.
"Muffs" for the hands will also help. Since I have not seen many of these since I was a kid this might be an item that you have to make with some scrap material, maybe even cutting the leg from a fleece pant or the arm from a sweatshirt.
Another thing that I used was a small ceramic heater that I put next to my Husbands bed. I would put it at the foot of the bed and put it on low with a low fan and it would gently push warmed air over him. That seemed to work very well.
And the obvious, make sure they are clean and dry, clothes are dry as damp clothes will make you feel colder.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I'm the one who gets cold. I can get so cold that my bones feel like they are frozen and I can't move. Adding on more clothing or covers doesn't get me warmer. It doesn't heat up my bones.

I have always had a problem with getting too cold. When I was 22, I ended up with a severe case of pneumonia simply because I had gotten too cold. I ended up being hospitalized. My doctor said that I survived because of my age.

What works for me: heated bed sheets, heated pads, heated blankets, individual heaters, hot baths, and making sure the extremities are covered. Hot baths are the best way to warm the inside of the body when it gets really cold, but the heat doesn't last long.

I hate it when people who don't understand what it's like to get cold say to just put on more. That doesn't work!!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

All my life due to medical issues I have had to have a "cold" room, preferably with air conditioning so I can breathe more easily. If I get cold, I add an extra sweater. Wherever I have gone, it was always too hot and once you are down to pants and a bra and still are too hot, and your body feels horrible, etc., what are you supposed to do. Well, there is one simple solution you can take and it costs perhaps pennies and everyone is happy. If you are always hot and you are with elderly people who are always freezing, besides naturally dressing them accordingly, when they are seated just simply place a heating pad on their laps on low. Within about 20 minutes their body will feel warm and comfortable and they will NOT feel the cold. I also did this in years back when it was so cold in my office (which I had set up in the basement) and the cost of heating to the proper temperature cost a fortune, I put a heating pad on my lap and I was in sheer heaven and so comfortable. Try it - it works. Those people can add clothes but you can't peel your skin off your body. So keep it cool!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

If it's their home, and they live there, the thermostat should be used to assist them in being comfortable. My partner and I have worked out that certain areas of the house will be kept at his comfort level, and some at mine. I put window a/c units in those rooms I use most: kitchen, office, bedroom. The rest remain unairconditioned. If it gets too hot, I put a fan on and blow it into his room. For winter, I have the safe-switch types of ceramic heater in his bathroom that blows in and warms his bedroom. I have electric blankets but he doesn't like that feeling; most elders don't. In the living room, I have a pad on his recliner that heats and vibrates. It has auto-shutoff which is essential so they don't burn themselves. Putting on and taking off clothes is literally painful for the Elders. It's easier for you to shed, then for them to do so, and if you haven't bought them easy-access clothing, it's even worse. I've changed out all of Bill's sweaters to button front and donated all his pullover types. It's just too hard for them to raise their arms. So the bottom line is, each of you have to respect the areas of the house that are "yours" and "theirs" and as their Caregiver, make sure they are the ones who are comfortable. They have a/c units you can roll up and plug in, and vent right out a window, without a big install. Try one of those, or one of the small ventless ones. It's all about the Big C: Compromise.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

1 2 3
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions