I think I might be confused about what Assisted Living actually is?

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Can a senior have an adult family member live with them at an Assisted Living facility in order to help with their care? And, if so, how does this affect the cost?

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Our library distributes a publication on senior housing which explains each kind of housing and services available from in home care to assisted living to nursing home care, and lists the facilities in this area comparing available services and costs.

Second source: Look for magazines such as Good Age for seniors in your area. They will have ads for senior housing near you. Check out (visit) those you find interesting. You may also want to check out home health aides that can come to your home for a few hours each day or to help you care for you mother. Twice a week for two hours to give bath, help with laundry and vacuum, etc can be a big help for you.

All senior housing that I know of requires that residents be at least 55.
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Assisted living sounds as if it is not an option. His only choice if ha wants to be there too is an apartment/independent living. It is an education for sure!
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People, Mike is asking about AL's only. Don't tell him about apts.
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It's a facility that provides for one person, not two.
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First, Medicaid does not "usually" pay for AL unless an agreement with Medicaid. The AL near me is one of them. You must have two years of money. Cost can be 5k to 7k a month depending on care needed. The higher level is for the dementia/Alzhiemers unit. After two years if there is no more money for care, medicaid takes over. My Aunt was in one facility that once she became a fall risk was transferred to longterm.

AL is just that, they assist. The residents should be pretty much able to take care of themselves except for bathing, meds, ect like mentioned previously. They usually have a doctor associated with them and an RN. Most are CNAs. A resident will be sent to the hospital if something they can't care for.
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For my late mom, her IL allowed for guests to stay in her apt no more than 10 sequential days a month and would be charged for guest meals and could be charged a guest activity fee (like $ 5.00 to go in the van with mom on the weekly shopping trip if there was roo m.) All tallied up onto next months bill.

Now we could & did hire an aide for a couple of months before mom moved to a NH to help with medication & keeping apt tidy. The facility gave me a list of names. Since mom was in IL this could happen. Not allowed in AL as all aides there had to be an employee of the facility. I assume this is a insurance & liability issue.

For AL (as well as IL, AL & NH all same place as this is a tiered facility), family could stay for a small daily fee in an apt set aside for family visits but had to request a reservation in advance. I think limited to 3days. There were folks who had reservations regularly for the apt too.

What can be done will be spelled out in the admissions contract.
If this is a CCRC (continuing care retirement community)please have someone else read the contract as well, as CCRC can be very restrictive as to what happens once a resident dies or is their needs get outside the care range of the CCRC.
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I visited an assisted living for my mom. Their rule was that if you need extra help, you had to hire an aide vetted by them for about 13 dollars an hour. I saw a resident and her aide in the cafe. She sat at a table with no food or drink. The aide looked painfully bored and completely consumed by whatever she was doing on her phone. She did not once attempt to engage the resident. So, if you should go that route, make sure you understand what you're getting, and check up on the person providing the care until you're confident that you have someone good.
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My parents started out in a housing of the elderly here in Massachusetts. Meaning they were living on there own without help except from me. A lot of people around them so in case there was a problem. My Dad went into a nursing home for rehab but ended up staying and passing away this past January. My mother a year ago had some problems and went into ALF which the cost was $6,000.00 per month. Included all meals, housekeeping, help with bathing, giving her meds. Rides to doctors. It was not covered by any insurance. She passed this past July. I did read that if a person was a veteran of WWII there was some assistance out there to help with ALF but not sure how long that would have taken. My mother was in the nursing home rehab first so I was able to get her into ALF a lot easier did not give her a choice. Good luck!
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You're not the only one to wonder if that would be possible - I investigated it myself, when things were getting pretty dicey at home but my mother still refused to consider long term care. The responses I got from two facilities were:

1. An outright no, on the grounds that I myself did not meet their age criteria and they would not allow under 55s to live in the retirement village (I was quite surprised at their inflexibility);

2. An offer of a two bedroomed apartment within an ALF, with memory unit as a further option for later. Events overtook us before I had time to digest the idea and weigh up pros and cons.

So: it depends on the service provider's imagination and initiative. But in general terms ALF means assistance from the service provider's professionally qualified staff rather than from enthusiastic amateurs like thee and me.
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Read "GladImHere's" comments. We had similar experience with an ALF, and quite frankly, the quality of care was not very good. They insisted we get a full time agency to work with mom (dad was fine). This is after they tried desperately to separate mom and dad (anniversary tomorrow - will have been married 59 years!).
I do not want to sound angry, but most of the experiences collected from other friends is that these facilities want to get you and your parents (quickly) into a more costly service option. We started at 4k/month and in 18th months were up to $20k, with aids. Once dad had a cut on his leg, that was bleeding, and the agency aid could not find a band-aid. The head nurse at the ALF told her "they are not our problem any more, you figure it out!" I was already starting to research other facilities (this one looked lovely from the inside and out) when this happened.

We now have mom and dad at an independent care facility at $3,500/mo plus the cost of full time aids which I've hired on my own. This took a lot of time, research and background investigations. That said, it was all worth the time and effort (yes I work full time too), and they are both happy, healthy and doing much better than they were at the ALF facility.

Good luck!
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