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My father is in a rehabilitation facility due to a fractured hip from a fall. He has developed a bedsore on his backside, which he says it's very painful. They come and turn him every 2 hours so he is not always lying on it. He also has a recliner.

wouldn't it help if some air got to the wound? I thought if he was lying on his left side for example, and even if someone made a little hole in the back of the depends where the sore it, that might help. if he has an accident the urine won't go to the back will it?

any help is appreciated. thanks!!!

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Oh I am so sorry to hear this. Hugs to you...
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Thank you Blannie. Unfortunately, my Dad passed away 4 days after being admitted to the hospital. It happened so fast, we are still in shock. I had just talked to him about his readiness to move from assisted living back home. He said he thought we could make it, then this.
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I am so sorry Didn'tknow about your dad's pressure sores. I learned (also) the hard way when I had home health aids showering my dad. I showered him one week and discovered a tennis ball sized tumor near his groin. How had the women showering him not noticed it? I have no idea. So from that point on, I kept my eyes on my dad and now my mom. I don't trust paid help to keep me posted - I use my own eyes. I hope your dad can get better now with the help he needs.
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My dad had compression fractures and resisted movement, howling in pain when rolled. This started while in the hospital. They seemed to be improving at the rehab facility, and we had home healthcare nurse visiting weekly cleaning and dressing the sores when we moved him to assisted living. We had to take him to the hospital for a UTI and when they undressed him, he had 2 very large pressure sores I knew nothing about. The home healthcare nurse told me nothing of them, the assisted living personnel that helped dress and bathe him didn't tell me either. I was shocked and would have had him to emergency to get help much sooner if I had known. To say I am upset by this is a huge understatement.
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Depending on the exact location and size of the bed sore sometimes a doughnut will help. You can usually buy them in different sizes or make your own. If you make one, get an appropriate size of sponge rubber about 1 1/2 inches or so in thickness. Then, cut an opening slightly larger than the bedsore. The thickness of sponge rubber around the sore area will provide relief. Then apply what your Dr. recommends to the sore.
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Yes V91 I am aware about real, that is why I don't understand why they are marketing these things as such....read the fine print, I surely faux does not have same qualities as natural, Its just a fuzzysoft padding. Both faux and real are pricy either way!
This rug at Costco is huge, by far a better choice financially speaking with a scissors and a little work!
It is real sheepskin, which I want for the oils and breathability!!!
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juju faux is no good you need the natural oils in the real stuff.
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Just thought I would share here about sheepskin! I was looking up online various sheepskin medical aids....
A) many are Faux Sheepskin, which I don't understand!!!
B) very pricy...
I found a huge Sheepskin rug at Costco which would easily make several nice bedpads and any other padding needed for about what is being charged for 1 pad at the med supply sales or even just sheepskin sales
Anyway so we got that, and are going to cut it up, make what we need! with some velro and etc....
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It's amazing, isn't it? How fast these bedsores can get. I realized this when I saw dad's discolored skin. Like you said, not even 10 days, it was a hole, bleeding. Not seeping bleeding but drops rolling down. Ugh!! Fortunately, the home care nurse used to specialize in wound care when she was in the states. She's the first one I've ever seen who did that - stuff the hole with gauze. {{shudder}} But it worked!

You're right. If you don't aggressively fight it, the hole will keep going in deeper until you see the bone. I was told this by one of the gov't caregiver.
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Get on this immediately! My mother developed a small spot on her sacrum (just above tailbone) 9 months ago and within a matter of 10 days it progressed and eventually became a wound 7inx7in! We have been fighting it ever since, including weekly visits to a wound care center, fluidized bed, wound vac, home health.
A plastic surgeon explained that a pressure sore is a cone-shaped area of damage, so by the time you see evidence on the skin the damage has been done deeper.
He needs immediate attention by a wound care specialist and you'll have to be very vigilant to make sure the facility treats it right.
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Coconut oil also helps. It moisturizes as well as a drying agent. I know that sounds contradictory but...
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As to the maggots, believe it or not there, are medical grade maggots raised in a clean environment. DO NOT USE ANY OLD ROADKILL AS A SOURCE.
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Ok now I am thinking....would it be appropriate to use the desinex, since it seems to help her fanny, on the leg blister? it never occurred to me? home health never really insisted on any medication as they were caught so early/not that bad/deep or oozing type. Just proper pressure relief. Anyway thanks for any input!
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I have been using Bag-a-Balm for over five years. This is the only product that has worked for my client who suffers from incontinence. In addition, good nutrition is key to assist with the healing of bedsores.
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one more thing to be clear on....i do find it neglect if it happens in a care facility as that should be some of the most basic and common of problems and should be well educated in how to manage.....ya maybe they will get one it does happen but they should be then on red alert, treating it with the latest and best care possible, that is their paid trained profession, they are not beginners!!!
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I have to also share this which I forgot about initially as we have been free n clear for couple years now.....
but first....my home health service was very thorough and gave us RN who warned us to rotate and watch for but not how to react once one is present. until of course we got the first one since her immobility issues. anyway 2 things stated to me as the one she was addressing I immediately took her to PC office when I found it and the DR's dressed it improperly which probably irritated it a little more and by the time home heatlh made it out to dress it properly was 10 days....well she clearly stated DR's are not well experienced with this type of wound care and also that they can just show up overnight and like stated before.....
Now for the other disturbing fact....several years ago we lived with a chronic blistering butt that started out as a request from her PC again for help, in the beginning of my care role.,... about what I should do i have seen some "diaper rash now and then" He prescribed silvadene cream to be applied after changing... well i guess years of that use actually was causing this awful chronic blistering of her bottom....she is even so scarred up....but home health ordered me to stop silvadene and use just a good barrier cream i use max strength desinex now and she is free and clear since!!! So the DR actually caused the thing i could be accused of being neglectful of....by following his direction!!! sorry rambling but it upsets me!!!!
so thru experience, trial and error I am learning how to manage at my loved ones expense
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Thank you Veronica!!!
When we had hospice come in for Mom we took her into the facility to see the hospice doctor. We showed him the giant pear shaped "blisters" on her hips. He said he had no idea what they were, in fact had never seen anything like it before. We continued to have Mom sleep on alternating sides and her back. We placed pillows under her knees and under ankles. We got and air mattress for her to sleep on, I made her high protein shakes........we did everything we could physically do and still.........
There was no neglect, perhaps a lack of training. It is as you say, the hospital nor any other group gave instructions on how to do things differently than we were doing. I do not beat myself up over this. My Mother was happy, laughing, playing with the dog, sitting outside on the patio, etc. up until two weeks before she passed on to her Glory.
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Once again I will stick my neck out and agree with Juju.
Bedsores can be due to neglect/abuse BUT more often it is the lack of information/training of the caregiver.
Here is am imaginary scenario. Mom and Dad are a devoted , raised a couple of kids, do lots of volunteer work in the community but at 62 mom has a devastating stroke. Dad is a huge bear of a man and can physically manage to lift mom in and out of bed to wheelchair , shower etc. and is determined never to place her in a nursing home. Mom can only move one arm, can't speak or swallow. Dad agrees to a feeding tube and learns how to use that and takes Mom home. Dad has some minimal professional help during the day and mom sleeps a lot of the time.
Dad how ever is worried about the nights he fears she could choke during night and he would not hear her because he takes his hearing aides out at night. So he asks their unmarried daughter who only lives 25 miles away and works in an office close by if she will just spend the nights so he can sleep worry free. No problem says daughter and moves back into her old room for the weekday nights. This is a fine arrangement because daughter can still do all her social activities and continue to go to school two nights a week but she will be the ears for dad at night.
Mom usually sleeps peacefully all night and has a catheter so no bed changing needed plus Dad says she needs her sleep because he does a lot of physical therapy during the day with her and the therapist comes once a week. They are doing everything right, Mom is not being abused or neglected but the visiting nurse comes by on her weekly visit and Dad is anxious to show her how he stands Mom up and pushes her feet forward so he thinks she is getting better. The nurse agrees and Dad manages very well which the nurse was confident he would and does not try and disillusion Dad about Mom's prognosis. When mom is stood on her feet her gown falls apart at the back and to her horrror the nurse notices a stage two ulcer on Mom's tail bone. Dad cheerfully acknowleges that it has been there for a week and he has been applying some aloe gel he found in the bathroom but it just seems to be getting worse. NOW how was this allowed to happen?
LACK OF INSTRUCTION IS THE ANSWER not neglect criminal or otherwise.
I have never seen classes offered for caregivers to learn basic nursing skills. The hospitals give instructions on discharge sometimes better than others and visiting aides often really don't know any better frequently hired to just be bath aides. Visiting RNs may be few and far between. If the patient is eligible for hospice even if the caregiver does not want to admit it they will provide so much help. As other psoters have noted you don't have to tell the patient it is hospice. Visiting nurse and bath aid is sufficient and the social worker is no problem as is the chaplain whoose services you are free to refuse. so once again it comes down to educate yourself before you take on the caregiving roll and even then if you are doing your best don't beat yourself up if something bad happens
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Jujubean, I agree with you. Those blisters can come on quick. The ones my mother had on her heels seem to appear pretty quickly after she went into the NH. When we took her out and brought her home those are the ones we healed in a very short time. The one on her tailbone and the ones on her hips were a different story. We had the one on her tailbone clearing up but the ones on her hip ones were too deep. If I knew then what I know now I would never have allowed my stepdad to put her in the NH. The neglect actually started with him.....
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I don't know if I agree that all pressure sores are a result of neglect, the one we have now occurred in just a few hours. We had made a new pillow for her to elevate her heels. A seam hit her leg just right and in one sitting made a blister as she fidgets so much, so it does happen. It just does not want to heal up!!!
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Try this, red heat lamp.... When I was CNA( trained from RN) it's worked so many time! I could NOT believe why bedridden patients getting bedsore , where's caregivers doing? I always recommend get pt's out of bed !! Set them Upright. Use donuts made from foam. I'm talking about this was 1978... First time start working at NH, saw many Pt's came with bed sores....this stages of age 2014 I could not believe someone still having bedsore??? Totally elderly Abuse! Sorry I'm so upset myself about bedsore....
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All good suggestions, glad to run across this, I am also battling a pressure sore on Momma's calf right now.
I want to add also when she had a persistent ulcer from a shoe rubbing her years ago the podiatrist prescribed zinc and vitamin c oral suppliments to promote healing ...I cant remember if the zinc was Rx or OTC but vit c was OTC, 1000mg daily I believe.
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Miasmom,
Never be sorry for asking questions. Even though I was part of your discouragement ( which I again apologize for, I am not trying to ruin it for anybody) there are lots of great answers here.
We all have similar yet different situations. Glad they have gotten your dad up! So often this caregiving gig is a roller coaster ride. I too come here for tips, ideas, advice, to laugh and to cry. It is a sounding board, sometimes we just need to vent....
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YAAY up and at 'em, miasmom, keep him moving!!
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caregiver 99, veronica91, doodlebug, ronniebray and anyone else involved in this little cat fight - cool it already! I am almost sorry I posted the darn question. up until now I've enjoyed this site- please don't ruin it for the rest of us. For those of you who have posted advice, thanks very much and I will see what I can try. thanks for your best wishes for my dad-they had him standing today😀so hopefully he will continue to get better.
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Caregiver99,
Aren't you also posting as RonnieBray? Why the dual personas?
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Silver Sulfadiazine cream works wonders! Also, there are pillows shaped like a donut that help too. I think your idea of having them change positions and letting air get to it is a good idea! Once it gets to a certain stage it is impossible to fix! I hope this helps!
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I read the remedies with great interest. They are all good tricks of the trade that may work in most situations but not all ...As you had read by all those answering your request. .

I suggest that you align yourself with a person at the facility that can employ all these different ideas. Have a champion for the cause. A person who would not be afraid to suggest these different approaches to the clinical team and management team at your loved ones facility. That person needs to have the "command of authority" and ask why these remedies may not have be tried and the physical why it didn't work if it was tried.. Then move on to the next suggested remedy. Don't give up or give in. The unfortunate thing is this takes time and will not correct itself over night. Yo have to find the mechanical cause of the problem and fix that first.

By the way good luck finding that third party I spoke about. "It may be you!" Don't hesitate to conact me if you need a pointer or two.
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Bedsores is a serious topic. If in doubt, Google 'stage 5 bedsore images'. I've heard stories from friends about their loved one being in wound care for MONTHs with something that began as a small stage 1 bedsore. It's not enough to treat a bedsore. The problem that has caused the bedsore needs to be addressed and resolved as well, so a bedsore doesn't occur again.

About 10 years ago my dad developed a tiny little bedsore. His physician wasn't even positive it could be called a stage 1...it was more like a stage 0.5, I guess. Whichever it was, as I recall it took close to a YEAR to heal at home, even with the cream treatment recommended by the physician. Why did it take so long? Maybe because all we were doing was treating the bedsore, not also addressing the problem that had led to the bedsore. (Fortunately, back then my dad was a bit more mobile than he is now.)

Whereas about a year and a half ago (during a period of time when Dad was no longer physically able to attend the day care he'd been attending in recent years, where he'd get up and move around often throughout the day), a watchful home agency caregiver with a nursing background alerted us that Dad's skin appeared to be nearing a NEW breakdown. (For my dad's particular case, the main issues appeared to be the length of time he was spending in chairs during the day vs walking and the fact that he doesn't shift his weight while he's sitting. Whereas...for another patient the main issue might be something else, such as urine touching skin for too long a time.)

First, we confirmed the seriousness of the problem by taking Dad for an exam with his dermatologist. Next, we made some changes at home. Thankfully, my dad's skin went back to normal-looking skin in a short period of time without a new bedsore ever developing. And according to the physician, the skin had been near a breakdown, just as the caregiver had advised. What worked in my dad's particular case was 1) For daytime, an alternating air cushion, which he sits on while he's in his wheelchair or recliner during the day and 2) for overnight, a ROHO overlay for his mattress that I found online. Note that me just turning him during the night was not helping sufficiently, as confirmed by physician exam. (Note that this is just what worked for my dad with his particular medical circumstances and another patient might need an entirely different approach.)

We were SO fortunate.

Don't let any facility tell you there's nothing that can be done to prevent a bedsore or that they're doing all they can if they really aren't. Seek out medical professionals who have solid expertise and success in preventing and treating pressure sores and get yourself seriously educated on this topic.

Then, keep fighting until you get your loved one's skin protected. It's 2014. There is more knowledge now and solutions that simply weren't available 10 or 20 years ago. But not everyone's up to speed. You have to be.
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caregiver99, you said "I" at least 8 times. Is it possible for you to post without so many "I" statements? It's hard on the eyes.
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