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Know you can puree just about anything but sometimes just not very appetizing.

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I use to take pot pies, the cheaper ones, and add a little beef or chicken broth to them and put it in a blender after I already cooked the pot pie. It tasted so good, I found myself enjoying the taste! Y
Plus it's fairly healthy too ! Hope this helps you.
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Reply to Starbeam7
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CountryGal55, thanks for your explanatory response.  As usual, I read more into the potential situation than existed.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Healthy smoothies. Kefir & or almond milk if glucose intolerate, 1/2 banana, a cup or two of berries, two tablespoons nutritional yeast, a tbsp avocado oil, some stevia to sweeten to taste. Blend in blender, add a little ice.
especially during summer... blackberries and blueberries by the handful added to the smoothie give it beautiful color and an antioxidant boost. And, speaking of Boost... it's a fine and nutritional supplemental drink... they have a high calorie one as well as a glucose balanced one. Also, Activia is very good drink or greek yogurt for those very important gut bacteria. Think nutrition - balance the food groups, protein, carb & good fats plus vitamins/minerals and count the calories- Know how many calories should be consumed to maintain weight.
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Reply to cwinter
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Hi, my mother liked creamed cauliflower, macaroni & cheese, & tiny pieces of hot dog. Although I did see her pulvarize a piece of cheese/pepp pizza: &(how she didn't choke on that I'll never know)
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Reply to Tiger55
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Juicing may help your Mom get in all the nutrients in delicious ways. You can make smoothies and soups. You might want to read Cherie Chalbom's books.

Easy (so tasty) recipe for healthy ice creme:
5 EASY Vegan "Ice Cream" Recipes | Dairy Free Summer Desserts
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-g8rBfqNUY
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Reply to ellenH6
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My dad eats the Frozen meal trays that are Salisbury steak with gravy, and boneless pork Riblets. I believe they are by OnCor, and they contain approx 6 patties in each. They’re super soft!
side dish - there’s a really great sweet potato and carrot mash, Leseur peas in a can are soft too. Breakfast croissants, egg bowls, and frozen fruit smoothies are a great treat!
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Reply to Rattled
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Contact food services with the local hospital, the local nursing home, a dentist's office, a nutritional expert, look up books in the library regarding soft foods, consult a school that teaches cooking ( chef's school), and ask for advice.  It doesn't have to always be blended.  Carefully chopped sometimes will work as well.  Ask a Speech therapist for advice as well.  They are into swallowing issues.
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Reply to debbiesdaz
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My friend has a four year old child with Cerebral Palsy, Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) and Dystonia. The child has been tube fed since birth. My friend blends normal food, e.g. she blended a hamburger with pretzels for the child's fourth birthday. Sounds strange? Not so much. It works for them. And it helps prevent more aspiration pneumonias.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My grandfather had throat and stomach cancer and puréed all his normal foods in a blender. Worked for him
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Reply to Jannner
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I've been giving my dad Nutrigrain bars. They are soft and he loves the flavors. They aren't exactly cookies, nor are they straight health food.
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Reply to Laughlin
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Has mom been evaluated for dysphagia? She needs to be evaluated to see if her problem is chewing with dentures, swallowing, choking on different thicknesses...

The dietician/therapist can recommend foods, diets and products that can help.
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Reply to Taarna
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CountryGal, you've received excellent suggestions, including those that touch on dysphagia.    But there's a valuable medical step that probably should be taken first.     Since you haven't mentioned it, I'm assume it hasn't been taken.   I apologize if you already have this information, though.

I assume that a medical person advised you to prepare soft foods?  If so, was a suggestion made for a videoscopic swallowing test?    In my experience, this is done routinely when someone has difficulty swallowing, in order to determine what the cause is, and prescribe the appropriate diet.

It's not an invasive procedure, but needs to be conducted by a speech pathologist, using hospital or lab equipment.    The patient is given various foods of various consistency, all of which are monitored remotely through a machine which allows the pathologist to determine which might be swallowed and which might be aspirated.   

A modified diet is then prescribed; there are different levels.  As someone wrote, there are mechanical soft and pureed categories.  I received several page printouts with very specific guidelines on what can and can't be eaten.  And it's quite surprising; foods that would seem to be appropriate aren't. 

The diet will also address whether liquids need to be thickened; this is important, as in some cases straws cannot be used, and water or other fluids absolutely need to be thickened to avoid aspiration.

Ice cream is a good example; b/c it's soft, it would seem to fit into a dysphagia diet.  Not so with all pureed foods.  It melts too quickly, becomes liquid, and can be aspirated.

I tricked it by giving my father a few teaspoonfuls of ice cream at a time so he could eat it when it still had some solidity.  As soon as it melted, it was ver boten.   And obviously, any ice cream should not contain nuts, chocolate chunks, cherries, or other foods that require chewing.

And you're right; it's not very appetizing.    I did some research, called food companies, and ordered brochures, some of which used techniques to present the food in a more appealing fashion.     Still, my father wasn't particularly excited by pureed foods.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Countrygal55 Aug 4, 2019
Thank you for your reply. Main issue with my mother is her dentures got taken out for cleaning per my request at her last hospital visit and then they were not able to put them back in. She doesn't want them back in and so I don't push the issue. I guess it's best though because of the need for good oral hygiene. Hospice encourages swabbing her mouth and if we did manage to get her teeth back in it would be a battle taking them back out then in. She has dementia also.
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I've had my share of oral surgery so became a pro and some of this: fish, mac/cheese or other pasta products that are softer, pancakes, especially made from scratch dutch pancake, cheesecake:-), cottage cheese, scrambled eggs, heartier soups (puree the chunkier types?), baked potato (instead of mashed), hard boiled eggs, more pureed type tuna salad, if you have to do mashed potatoes try it with different gravies...oh...and the stouffers stuff if you have access, like rarebit (on something else), corn souffle, spinach souffle. Quiche, sweet potatoes...
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Reply to robinr
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I ate cream of wheat with butter and "Bene-protein" every day while in the hospital. I had a very hard time with solid foods as well. Beneprotein is a protein powder that the hospital serves with every meal. It is available on Amazon.

We like smoothies. You can add fruit and nuts to the smoothie which will be chopped up and blended in. Even spinach, carrots, and other veggies can be blended in.
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Reply to 7again
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Yes, puree food is not so fun. My brother could eat some foods without puree so you would have to test. Soft and even texture worked best and adding fat - butter, olive oil or coconut oil helps it go down and adds needed calories. Soft food that worked for a while - salmon w/butter, Trader Joes turkey meatloaf(other brands may work) with extra tomato sauce, summer squash, oatmeal with coconut oil lots of maple syrup. Also sweet potato with lots of butter. Mashed white potato he had a little trouble with which was a bummer.
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Reply to MarSoCal
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SOUP, SOUP AND MORE SOUP
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Reply to moecam
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You can Buy frozen riced vegetables. For my elderly dog I had a hand mixer and I would make food into little pieces or pureed. Sweet potatoes with cinnamon, avocados, baked apples or applesauce, Rice pudding, Meat pureed with vegetables your mom likes. Acorn squash with sugar free maple syrup & cinnamon. Bananas, berries & YOGURT: I highly recommend Fage plain yogurt, that you can sweeten with Truvia, A natural and healthy sweetener that has no aftertaste. Yogurt is great to mix with all kinds of things. I mix it with chicken and vegetables & add spices that are mild. Think about smoothees, and see if you can get your mom to try them. Brown rice is much better than white rice, And you can get it bag by Uncle Ben's. Best wishes
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Reply to Maltesemom
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Tofu might be helpful as a protein source and there's lots of stuff you can do with it. Roasted in chunks, but still very tender. Kind of bland for me, but with sauces, you can dress it up. Also a nice way to add protein to something like fruit smoothies for treats/desserts.
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Reply to shb1964
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Surprisingly, many seniors start wanting Fish Sticks! My DH said it was easier to eat the fish sticks than anything else because they were soft! I would cook him as many as he wanted every day.

On another note, we had a family member who had no teeth for 6 months and he said pureed steak was wonderful - it was some of the veggies that were awful.

You can also use Junior Baby Foods!
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Reply to RayLinStephens
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You've had lots of great suggestions here.  I was on a puree/sof food diet after surgery I had made lasagna for my family and saved a little of the ricotta mixture & sauce for myself.  just put a little in a bowl, sauce on top and warmed in the microwave.  It was great!
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Reply to EllensOnly
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One of my stepfather's favorites: Steam cauliflower, mushrooms and chopped shallots. Puree the mixture and you are good to go. He also liked pureed butternut squash or pumpkin. I think you have to be careful puree-ing hot stuff in a blender, so you may have to cool a little and re-heat. We found a little bit pricey blender called Baby Brezza would steam--on a timer, no less!--and then puree anything. The timer was helpful. Hormel makes a series of about a half dozen already pureed entrees that live on the pantry shelf and heat in the micro in one minute, and he liked those. Some of them were actually tasty enough to use as a dip for the rest of the family. We got those online from Healthy Kin. (We never found them locally). I think there is a website called dysphagia dot com that had helpful ideas. Can she eat salad whizzed through a little food chopper? With enough moisture perhaps added to aid swallowing? Hardware stores and such usually carry one. I think ours is made by Black & Decker, but I'm sure there are others. All my love to you. It is a challenge to try to make it appealing....
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Reply to InItForGood
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How about bananas,yogurt,smoothies. My mother had throat cancer and she could tolerate Ensure with ice cream blended in. If you decide to do smoothies, there are recipes that have fruit,vegetables, and protein powder blends. A dietician or nutritionist may also be helpful.
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Reply to Peanuts56
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Not everyone has the time, ability or inclination to prepare a modified diet 3 times a day forever, when you are dealing with the other challenges of full time caregiving it can often seem like one chore too many. We were fortunate that our meals on wheels provided frozen meals with several modified options that I was able to pull out on days when cooking seemed too much to ask, pricey but worth it. Some people will tell you that supplements like ensure and mass produced foods from companies like Hormel are horrible dietary choices but by this stage healthy diets are less important than calories, don't be afraid to rely on any convenience foods she finds palatable.
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Reply to cwillie
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Countrygal55 Aug 4, 2019
Thank you. I am an only child and I do get overwhelmed sometimes when it comes to cooking with all the other responsibilities. I do use Stouffers meals at times because the meats are soft plus she does seem to like them and ...yes for convenience. I've been feeling guilty about this and so much appreciate your words of reassurance.

BTW thanks to everyone who took the time to reply. So very much appreciated.
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If you google "dysphagia recipes" you will find a ton of recipes that can be made at different consistencies. You can also google "mechanically soft recipes. Both of these will give you plenty of different recipes that are really tasty and they can also give ideas on how to look more tantalizing. My boyfriend and I both have dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) so I have been trying new recipes and some are better then "regular" food (in my opinion). Good luck and let yourself be creative.
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Reply to POTSwarrior
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scrambled eggs, what if you mix some pureed vegetables (peas or spinach) with the mashed potatoes - would she eat it?
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Reply to NancyIS
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Momsmeals.com has a great selection of pureed meals, also Hormel health labs
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Reply to brtrains
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I've had some nasty dental work done, so I've gotten to know the soup and dairy sections of the grocery store. They make every flavor of soup from potato-leek and corn chowder to cheese, and the yogurt flavors today are delicious. I had lemon meringue pie greek yogurt for breakfast today, and my mom beat me to the caramel apple flavor. Just watch out for the "light" versions which use artificial sweeteners and cut down the nutritional value.
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Reply to SFdaughter
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robinr Aug 2, 2019
I know your pain:-)
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My dad loved crustless cheesecake with whipped cream as a daily treat when he was in hospice care - I made a lower carb version.

Also made “oopsie rolls”
as a soft food/bread substitute he didn’t need to chew. Recipe is on the Internet. I’d make a batch and freeze them - thaw for a few seconds in the microwave.
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Reply to jakefix
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I used to make all sorts of soups for my Husband.
I would make them a bit thicker with added veggies like carrots, sweet potato rather than flour, pasta or rice.
I would process them as much as I needed to. I would portion them into 2 cup Mason or Ball jars and pop them in the freezer.
A few of the soups I made were:
Loaded Baked Potato soup, Split Pea with ham, Stuffed pepper or a stuffed cabbage soup, Beef Barley, Tomato soup (I would roast pounds and pounds of tomatoes if I happened to see them at the close out corner of the store)

One of the other things that I made for him and he loved...he had always been a pizza guy would eat it anytime he could. I made the Cauliflower Pizza crust, pre baked all the toppings and he could eat that with no problem, later I did process it and while it did not look like pizza it did taste good.

Grits or cream of wheat with an egg cooked on top of it. I started adding the egg for an extra protein boost.

I also switched his dinner and breakfast. He was more alert in the morning and I started giving him his largest meal then so breakfast was often the soup or the girts with egg, lunch might be scrambled eggs or yogurt with fruit and dinner again yogurt or cream of wheat.

I would also make pudding, custard. He loved Key Lime pie so I would make the filling and pour it into little ramekins and bake that. I would get about 5 or 6 and he would have that mid afternoon sometimes.

As far as appetizing goes what you puree may not look great but the flavor is there. When I was a kid we took care of my Grandma and my Dad would process our dinner and put it on a plate for her just like our meal, a mound of beef or whatever (he would use the gravy to thin meats so that it could process), a spoon full of the veggie, a scoop of potato or whatever else there was. She was able to eat and identify what she was eating. Far different than tossing everything into the blender and having one pureed mixture on the plate.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Anything Healthy that can be Pureed.
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