Rehabilitation Center - AgingCare.com
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Rehabilitation Center

An in-patient facility providing therapy and treatment to restore functioning after an illness or injury. Often rehabilitation centers are used in the transition between hospital and home or long-term care.
  • Upon discharge from the hospital, seniors often refuse to participate in vital rehabilitation programs. Use these tips to help them stick to their prescribed recovery plan.
  • After being hospitalized for a fall, stroke, acute illness like an infection, or a surgery, seniors are often prescribed a stay at an inpatient rehabilitation facility to help them get back on their feet. Knowing what to expect during this recuperation period can help the entire family to adjust and prepare to make this experience a smooth and enjoyable one.
  • Many surgeries require some type of post-operative care and physical therapy, sometimes even in a specialized rehabilitation facility. The prehabilitation process focuses on helping patients go into surgery in the healthiest possible state to aid in healing and minimize their recovery time. Improvements in diet, exercise, and mental health can make a world of difference in a patient's recovery following a joint replacement, cancer treatment and other intensive procedures.
  • When a loved one needs to go to a skilled nursing facility for rehabilitation following a surgery or procedure, it can be difficult for family members to know how to handle this transition period. See how you can help your loved one get healthy again.
  • Seniors who undergo an intensive rehabilitation following knee or hip replacement surgery may experience a three-fold increase in their mobility.
  • You've found a surgeon you trust, scheduled the procedure, and figured out which senior rehabilitation center your loved one will be staying in, but are you prepared for what comes after the surgery?
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  • While Alzheimer's disease and dementia progress differently in each and every person, it is important for both the patient and their caregiver to remember that a diagnosis isn't an immediate death sentence.
  • The way we deal with difficulties and failures says a lot about how we live our lives. But when these things are caused by something out of our control, like dementia, should we just accept our limitations or fight them tooth and nail?
  • So many people consider sharing a diagnosis publicly to be an act of courage. Yes, this does help to lessen the stigma against diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia. But are we making too much of this simple deed? Shouldn't we all be able to share our true selves without fear of abandonment or embarrassment?
  • Cognitive decline is difficult to definitively diagnose, but like other diseases, it can be awkward to talk about this elusive prognosis. Most people don't wish to get detailed updates on others' health, but assumptions can be especially frustrating.
  • Memory loss, difficulty solving problems and confusion are a few of the signs that may indicate various types of cognitive impairment or a form of dementia. Our parents and grandparents cared for their families and this is when relatives and caregivers can begin helping them. Consulting their physician and being proactive with diet, rest and exercise are among the top areas in which they will need encouragement and assistance.
  • A recent reading of "Flowers for Algernon" has helped me realize that my journey through cognitive impairment does not have to include the culturally-expected suffering.
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