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I am more and more confused about the fact that bank customer service agents are not aware that a guardianship order is stronger than a Power of Attorney. Each time I call a bank on my elderly person's behalf and mention I have a guardianship order in place, they say I need to fill out a POA form with my elderly parent present. Why is that the case?

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I was recently granted guardianship for my wife. Our savings bank does not have a program for guardianship. The court ordered a "blocked account" on her savings. Meaning I cannot withdraw money from that account. However that was modified at the annual hearing to allow me to withdraw up to $250.00 per month for wife's expenses, Think manicure/pedicure, hair care, diapers, clothing, etc.
But I have no such restrictions on her checking account. BUT if it should accumulate finds in excess of $10,000 It would then fall under the court order, which follows our state law.
Since the savings bank does not have any procedures for guardianship or for blocked accounts, what the bank did was to freeze her account effectively prohibiting any withdrawals without a valid invoice or bill for what ever. In that case the bank will provide a certified cashiers check payable to that vendor. If it exceeded the 250 limit I would need the courts approval.
I can make deposits, which I intend to do when her checking account nears the 10k amount.
Maybe your guardianship papers include some instructions or protections in this area. As I mentioned, my instructions follow the state law and the court orders.
Oh and I keep all receipts and copy the ATM receipts because they fade to nothing in just a few months.
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They said that you needed to explain how you were going to use the money?!! Unreal!!!

Tell them it’s none of their bloody business.
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Tiresome numbers of customer service staff have never heard of powers of attorney or anything like it, or, one can infer, ever had occasion to wonder how their sweet little old customers will manage once they can't hobble to the bank any more.

I did notice as time went on that more financial services and utilities organisations were redirecting me to specialist customer service teams. I hope it was a trend.

You may derive some grim satisfaction from thinking that one of these fine days these young people's eyes will be opened "by experience, sir - by experience!" Meanwhile, patience and persistence; and put in a plea for additional training any time anyone asks you. You are helping the public education process, if that's any consolation.
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I tried that. One of the institutions did provide additional data and told me that it would be processed this week. The other said I would need to write a letter stating what I want to do with his money. I already explained that I have orders to use his money for his benefit. I believe that many of the customer service agents get confused between a POA and guardianship. POA the elderly person grants authority, Guardianship says that the individual cannot grant authority and is subject to an appointed person over them because of their incapacity to make decisions.
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I agree, ask to speak to someone higher up the chain of command and keep going until you find someone who isn't ignorant about these issues.
I might add that people on the forum have mentioned that certain banks have a reputation for being contrary, as a full fledged guardian/conservator you have the ability to take your ward's business elsewhere.
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Technically, guardianship only covers decisions about the person (where they live, etc.). Conservatorship covers decisions about the person's financial affairs. If your document covers both, tell the bank that you have a conservatorship. If they still balk, ask to speak to a supervisor.
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