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My parents have legally requested DNR and they both live at home. I'm their full-time Caregiver. Does DNR include while at home. And does it include anyone visiting our home, who knows CPR and might attempt CPR? The reason for asking, my friend just started to help me cook dinner two nights a week, to give me a break this month. Last night, she asked me, "Would our friendship be over, if something happened to your parents while I was cooking?" That question got me thinking about my parents DNR. Should I let everyone that enters our home know, no CPR if an event occurs needing it? I love my parents and my natural instinct is to do CPR. My husband and I talked about buying a defibrillator to use at home. Tomorrow, I plan to contact our family lawyer, he specializes in Elder Law.

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Our family is 100% OKAY with respecting my parents DNR. My husband and I already own a defibrillator for any visitor to our cabin, because the cabin is one hour from medical help due to isolation. My question was posted, because I'm only curious about where the DNR applies, at home or restaurant or visiting a neighbor, etc. My parents are mobile and I take them out once a week to keep them socialized.
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Freqflyer mentioned an important point. A DNR and similar directives apply only if there isn't hope that there would be an quality of life on the other side. For example, if a person was of reasonably good health, but fainted and their heart stopped for some reason, it would be good to revive them. However, if they were on their death bed and their heart stopped, then the DNR applies. People can sign a DNR years before their actual deaths occur. We wouldn't want to use their DNR as a death sentence if something happened to them and death was no imminent. We have to use judgment in executing a DNR.
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"Some criticize the term "do not resuscitate" because it sounds as if something important is being withheld, while research shows that only about 5% of patients who require CPR outside the hospital and only 15% of patients who require CPR while in the hospital survive.[1][2] Patients who are elderly, are living in nursing homes, have multiple medical problems, or who have advanced cancer are much less likely to survive.[3]"Patients who are elderly, are living in nursing homes, have multiple medical problems, or who have advanced cancer are much less likely to survive.[3]
(Do not resuscitate From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
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That's an excellent question as I always wondered about that. Does a person try CPR and if it works great. But if the patient's heart stopped beating again, do they try again or let it be?

I just pulled out my own Advance Medical Directive documents, and it says not to use extraordinary medical measures that would only prolong the dying process. Such as artificial life support, surgery, artificial nourishment, yada, yada, yada.

Oh, it does say including Do Not Resuscitate [DNR] and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation [CPR].

I would think if one was having a heart attack then CPR would be tried. If one had a very serious illness with no chance of recovery, then CPR would not be tried.

Now it has me thinking, I think I will make some changes to my Advanced Medical Directive.
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If your parents have a DNR it is because that is their wish, it would be wrong for you (or anyone else) to initiate CPR, even more wrong to invest in a defibrillator. I made certain my mother's document was legally binding while in her own home home and I would not hesitate to produce it if the need should ever arise.
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