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I work 6 days a week and she calls me asking questions that can wait. I told her I am working and she gets mad and hangs up. Asking me every day when I will be finished. It is very annoying. Trying to get someone to come in and help out. So far no luck. She asks me what is for dinner at 8 am. I have no idea and I have stomach problems, so sometimes I don't want to eat. Seems like she is thinking about her stomach 24/7. What can I do?

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Mom needs reassurance & company. So she will keep calling.

As time goes by, without constant answers from someone, she will either sit & fret or possibly go out wandering in search of company (that will depend on her mobility, personality & outside access).

I'd keep working on getting her some daytime company. Either in-home aides or she goes to adult day care.
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Reply to Beatty
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Set the phone on silent. Block her number through the day so she can't leave voice mail and you won't be tempted to listen to them.

Mom has dementia? She may be progressed enough to not be alone ever. And according to your profile, you are shuttling your daughter around which also causes to feelings of being overwhelmed. This daughter just be in her 40's, without a working car, and you have to transport her? Boundaries! She is old enough to figure her transportation out without involving you.
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Reply to gladimhere
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BurntCaregiver Sep 18, 2022
glad,

Giving the daughter rides is not what the post is about. You don't know how many rides she gives or how often. That's not what's causing her overwhelming problems.
Her senior-brat mother calling her all day long while she's at work to ask what's for dinner then having a tantrum when told she's at work is what's overwhelming her.
Then after working all day returning home to then cope with the needs and demands of an elderly toddler until bedtime.
Repeat day after day. This is likely what's overwhelming her and where those boundaries need to be set.
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I know you probably don't want to, but if u can't find help Mom should be placed. If she has money Memory care if not Medicaid in a nice LTC facility with no access to a phone.

You are not going to get Mom to stop calling even if she gets an aide. She no longer understands that you need to work. All she knows is she is home alone and you should be there. I would put my phone on do not disturb, no calls at all. If a receptionist puts calls thru, ask her/him to tell Mom your busy in a meeting.

To be honest, your Mom should not be alone. I know, your trying and there is a shortage of aides.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Stop taking her calls. Let them go to voicemail. Block your voicemail so she can't leave messages.
You say you're working on getting your mother a caregiver/companion. I hope that happens soon. How about getting her placed in AL or a managed care facility?
It's only going to get worse for you the longer she lives with you. Please consider placement for the sake of your own sanity.
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Reply to BurntCaregiver
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glad,

I did read the OP's profile. She says that she gives her daughter rides. She does not complain about the rides and her post is not about the rides.
The post is about her mother's incessant phone calls to her at work and ridiculous questions like what's for dinner at 8 am. Then the tantrums and hanging up if she tells her she can't talk while at work.
This is the problem she is writing and asking about.
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Reply to BurntCaregiver
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collegemom65, was your Mom a stay at home Mom, or did she have a career outside of the house? That in its self can make a world of difference, and explain why she keeps calling you at work.

My own Mom thought all women should stay home and have babies. It use to irritate her seeing female sportcasters on TV "what do they know about sports?" was her all time complaint when watching football. Same with women running for political office, etc. Also felt the same about women who were doctors, refused to go to one as men doctors are a lot smarter. YIKES!!

Thus, my own Mom just couldn't understand why I had a full-time career. I should be home cleaning the house, planning meals, doing laundry, ironing, etc. My Dad, on the other hand, thought differently.

Since your Mom lives with you, there is the adult/child dynamics. Mom has once again taken the role of the adult, and you have the role as the child. We are still kids in their eyes, and what do we know.

Your Mom feels you have been at work that day long enough, similar as to being out with your friends after school... time to come home. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to change the thinking of a parent. Not to mention one who has dementia.

I understand you need to take her calls in case there is an emergency, so blocking her calls isn't good at this point in time. Blocking would be good if your Mom had a caregiver at home with her, the caregiver could call you on her own phone if needed.

Contact your local counsel on aging to see if they any ideas.
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Reply to freqflyer
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Set up a menu for meals for your mom for a week, if you don’t feel like eating fine. Still make mom whats on the schedule. If mom is mobile put a white board or poster on the refrigerator showing what time you get off work and when you will be home, plus what time if you can call to check up on her. Then Ignore the calls. At lunch time call mom to check in.
if you can set up a camera so if she does call, you can check the camera to make sure she is up and about.
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Reply to KaleyBug
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Your profile states your mother suffers from age-related decline, alzheimer's / dementia, anxiety, depression, hearing loss, incontinence, mobility problems, parkinson's disease, sleep disorder, urinary tract infection, and vision problems.

If this is accurate she should not be left alone.

Find her a facility.
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Reply to ZippyZee
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While you're turning off your phone, please think about ordering delivered meals
( I just saw a commercial for one called, "Hello," but I'm sure you'll find more if you do a search).

Sounds like Mom needs companionship in addition to food (as we all do). There are options that free you up:

1. Call Visiting Angels and get a companion who likes to cook (very different than someone who is coerced into cooking). Perhaps getting a pet would bring her joy.

2. Place mom in Independent or Assisted living where prepare meals and compel residents to eat together so that they have the companionship they needs. When mom is full and connected to other humans, you won't be the center of her attention.

3. Give mom a time when you can be reached or when you will call her.

4. Make an appointment for yourself with a Gastroenterologist.

5. Please consider working 4-5 days a week and start enjoying your life before it is over..................take some time to meditate and medicate your intestinal tract.
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Reply to ConnieCaretaker
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BurntCaregiver has put out a lot of terrific, albeit, blunt advice. I very much appreciate the comments.
Is your Mom safe to be home alone? You know if she can be.
I only call my Mom once a day, evening time. She yells. I do not & will not live with her (NPD + Borderline + Early Onset/former Alcoholic + Manic). I do not pick up the addt'l times she calls. I see if the voice to text is of anything important. It never is. Rambling. I do not have the bandwidth to deal with them. I have career + grown Kids in town..
If possible, elderly should/should have majored on developing/maintaining friendships & hobbies thru the years. Get to know your neighbors. Be kind. Learn to assimilate. Take up gardening. Purge a pile or drawer or closet. Respect that your grown Kids and their Kids deserve to live. Accept the help & make a plan yrs in advance for assistance in home or away, if you can afford to. My Mom can afford to but refuses to accept back in her old cleaning gal or an errand gal part time. For now.
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Reply to eat-pray-love
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