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Can you tell me what is the time limit for snow removal.
I live in a condo. Hackettstown. Last year snow was not removed for three days at a time and I was unable to get out of my house, the door would not open.
Calling the office I was told they would get to it soon and soon never came.
I am a disabled senior and being trapped in my home is a very scary situation. I am starting early before snow to find out what I should do this winter.

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Pam, you are making me homesick for my old hometown of Syracuse :P

Because of climate change ie global warming, I really believe we will have a bad snow/ice storms this winter. Not looking forward to it.
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12 hours after the storm ends. There was a storm Feb 12, 13, 14 & 15 that dumped 16 inches and there was a state of emergency declared. That means nobody goes anywhere. The employee who does the shoveling was likely snowed in too. This winter, according to the Farmers' Almanac, will be just as bad or worse. So stock up on canned soup, flashlights and toilet paper and be prepared to hunker down. (advice from Buffalo. did you know we can get seven FEET in one night? that's the record.)
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Glad you got one answer, Betsy. When you call the disability help line and when you talk to the condo management, let us know what you find out from them, too.
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Town told me the limit is 12 hours
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Betsy, would it be possible to move to a senior retirement condo where your front door opens to a hallway instead of to the outside elements? Even though the thought of moving is overwhelming, it would eliminate the fear of feeling like you are trapped if you can't open your front door. I know that would bother me, too.
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I'm feeling like most people here are missing the point. It is frightening to be locked in your house with no way out. Yes, you can call 911 (if you still have phone service). But if you call 911 and tell them your kitchen is on fire they are going to tell you to vacate the building. And if you don't have the strength to force the door open against the snow or break a window and crawl out, how to you vacate your premises?

Is it likely that your house will catch fire during a snow emergency? Is it likely that a gas leak will occur? Probably not. Is it possible? Certainly, just as possible as on any other day of the year.

You can stock up on toilet paper all you want, and you can sensibly not try to shop during a weather emergency.

It is NOT paranoid to fear being locked in your home for days, especially when this has happened in the past. A plan for minimizing the time that condition exists is sensible.

Of course seniors don't need to get out and about in a snow emergency. But I really think most posters here are missing the point. Being locked in a building you can't get out of in an emergency is unsafe. Planning ahead to prevent that is sensible. Betsyross asked for help in dealing with this. Thanks to those who took this question seriously.

Thinking that Betsyross just wants to go gallivanting around or out to buy milk misses the point entirely.
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Sunflo, if her power is out and she has a cordless phone (so popular) she can't call out, because the base station is OFF. Make sure there's at least one 20th century vintage old fashion phone that does not rely on house power.
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You should not be out in a snow storm. Too easy to slip and fall.
I would suggest that before the winter gets harsh you pack some supplies. Items that will not spoil. Heavy storms can cause power outages. Groceries for up to 3 weeks. Boost milk, tuna, crackers, nuts, whatever fits your diet. This is how we plan in Miami for hurricanes.
Also renew you meds every month a week prior to the last one, in a few months you will have accumulated a few extra, in case you can not get to the pharmacy or vice versa.
I lived up north, then I figured out that you never have to shovel humidity!
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sunflo2, same thing with my parents. But I think we all worry somewhat ourselves. I know in my area, if the weatherman says SNOW, people start to panic buy... need more milk, bread, and toilet paper. I panic for cat food and cat litter :P

My Dad feels he needs to shovel out his driveway, well he's 93 and still thinks it's his duty in case he and Mom need to get their car out.... and go where?.... in case of an emergency.... ah, Dad, just dial 911 in an emergency, their vehicles can get through the snow.

I think Dad uses shoveling-emergency as an excuse to get out of the house, as Mom keeps the temps at sauna.... he needs the fresh air :)
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My mom worries about the same thing. Here is what I tell her. Buy water, frozen dinners, staples, etc and have at least one weeks worth on hand. Have flash lights or battery lanterns on hand...just like disaster preparedness. She is always talking about being trapped and no good Samaritans digging her out....I remind her she can call 911 in an emergency. She can call the power company if she is without power and the heat goes out and or 911 to help her get to a shelter.

Seniors don't need to get out and drive around just cause neighbors or others are driving around. As others have said. STAY put. Watch the news and for heavens sake stock up on items needed including water ahead of winter.
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Betsy, if the snow was that bad, probably those who come to do the snow plowing couldn't get out their doors, either. Which also means the stores would be closed, too.

Rule of thumb, if the schools in your area closed because of snow, you stay home.
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My son was an apt/condo maintenance manager for 2 complexes in Indiana. Talk about snow! He had a list of all the elderly and disabled and he always made sure they were plowed/blown and checked on first. Yes, he is a wonderful man and always had plenty of home made goodies from all his "old friends" as he called them, come the holidays. Talk to your condo manager.
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The other thing I'd do (since I also live in a condo bldg) is to make friends with some of the other residents and set up a system that if you need help, they'll help you.

We recently had a power outage from a bad storm and so our elevator wasn't working. One lady who lived on the third floor came back from shopping and couldn't walk her groceries to her apt. Another resident went to her unit and brought all of her meds back down, and so the lady with the groceries went and stayed with her daughter until the power came back on.

I'm 64 and still in very good shape. I'd be happy to help another senior in our complex if they needed help. I bet you have some people where you live who would offer help. Maybe go to the condo assn and suggest they put together a list of folks who might need help in an emergency (power outage, excess snow, flood) situation. Good luck!
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Last year was an unusually bad winter in the Northeast. Lots of streets went unplowed, schools were closed, parking lots weren't shoveled. It was a mess. This winter isn't likely to be so bad, but if it is, and you have an emergency, you can call the police or an ambulance.
Perhaps you could stock up on canned goods and bottled water. Also, if the snow is that bad, and the roads and sidewalks are icy, maybe it's better to stay inside until conditions improve.
I walk with a cane, having had my spine crushed in a riding accident. No way do I go gallivanting around when it's slippery underfoot.
However, the fact that your door was frozen shut, and you were unable to leave your condo in the event of a fire or other emergency, is far more serious than the fact that you couldn't get to WaWa to buy a loaf of bread. That's something the condo association should be told about, so they can come up with a plan in case it happens again.
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Betsy, is there a condo association? Are tenants formed into any sort of association, say with an email group? Did your neighbors all experience the same thing last year? Have you gone to the board and complained and asked what the plan for snow removal is for this winter? Also, does your municipality have any regulation about timely snow removal? The thing is, in a condo, unless you have a specific contract that covers grounds keeping and snow removal, you may be responsible for arranging for it yourself. You are wise to inform yourself now, ask all of the above questions and get good answers. Good luck!
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The condo probably has rules/promises about timeliness of snow removal.

But they probably base those goals on an "average" winter. We are all at the mercy of "unexpected" conditions.

If I were you I would go to the condo association president or whatever your governing body is, now, before snow starts, and explain your fears about being trapped in your home, not able to escape a gas leak or fire, etc. An able-bodied person may be able to fight their way through a door or go out a window. You may not have the strength to do that. Therefore you'd like assurance they will place your unit (and those of other handicapped persons) on a priority list.

Certainly stay in, stay warm, listen to good music with a good book. But I don't blame you for wanting an exit in case of immediate emergency. If the condo association can't give you some satisfaction, call the disability helpline in your area and ask what your options are.
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When the snow is so bad you can't get out the door, you are safer staying put. If you have a health emergency you call 911 and they will get you out. The last thing a disabled person should do is attempt to drive around. During the blizzard of '77 our mayor said "grab a six-pack and stay home".
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No not a prank: I was hoping someone could helpme with this problem.
Just reaching out for help
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I know what I'd do. I'd stay home 'til they shoveled. Or move to Miami.

Uh, Betsy. Why would you think www.agingcare.com could answer this question? Is this like when I used to make prank calls and ask people if their refrigerator was running?

And to catch it next time it went by?
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