Searching for a communication device mom with Parkinson's can use. She has a good grip and may be able to use her knuckles to press letters.

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She can barely make a sound. She is so frustrated with herself. She is as smart as a whip. She is a retired teacher.

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Please find the book "Helping the Patient Tell Their Story."  You may be able to locate it in a library collection since it's 30 years old.
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I feel for your mom. I'm a quadriplegic with contracted hands. I also have a good grip. I'm able to hold a stylus and do all my communication, read, watch news and movies on my iPad. I would not know what to do without these. I hope you and your mom finds this helpful.
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I just went back to Amazon to check this (amazon.com/Boogie-Board-eWriter-Blue-J32220001/dp/B010HWCEAO) This is not the exact one I purchased, but if you do not care about color, the gray one is currently $20.90 (unless you have Prime, remember you need to buy at least $25 to get free shipping! I ordered the sleeve in hot pink so it is easier to locate - dementia patients tend to misplace things - and spare stylus in 3pk.)
I had previously searched in the "Find answers in product info, Q&As, reviews" for hearing issues, and found a few reviews. This time I searched for Parkinson and found the following comment:
"I run two Parkinson's groups during the week. And on of patients had brought one in, because of her speech. It was getting harder to understand her and to communicate with her and she would write out what she was trying to say. And I ask where did she get her tablet from and she told me she received it as a gift. I ask for the brand name check for it in craft stores but I couldn't find the count that I needed. Found them on amazon and gave them as Christmas gifts. I have them practice their name, write things down that they need. Communication tool because with Parkinson things tend to get smaller and handwriting less legible. it will help him to communication with you and have less frustration."

The communication devices offered elsewhere might offer more bells and whistles, but are likely expensive. If all she needs to do is be able to write what she wants to say, this is worth giving a try!
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If she needs to use a phone, the suggestion commutergirl gave would be a place to start.

An option for her to communicate in person - check out Boogie Board on amazon. I got this because mom has no hearing in one ear, limited in the other (if she/they remember to replace the battery!).

It is smaller than a sheet of paper, very thin and lightweight, so it is easy to bring along, even for outings. It is an LCD screen that you write on with a stylus (any pointy non-writing item will work, even fingernails) and has an erase button to clear what had been written, allowing her to write more. It does not save anything, but for what you need, this is not an issue.

It is cheaper (and smaller mostly) than buying a tablet (you really don't need all that tablets offer!) She would be able to write what she wants to say without carrying a notebook and pencil around (and wasting all that paper!) Cost was about 25$. Battery is non-replaceable, but it claims to last for year. For a minimal amount, insurance can be purchased in the event that it fails. They will either attempt to repair it or reimburse the cost.
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CapTel has a telephone that types the conversation from both. Check with your state, in Indiana, it is free as a hearing aid type of communication. I have the model that is compatible with Magic Jack as we got rid of landlines a few years ago. I see cost wise, its around $75
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Your mother should definitely be seen by a speech pathologist or occupational therapist that specializes in assistive devices. The right one could assess her, recommend the best device and teach her AND her caregivers (this is critical) how to use it. A physician might be able to refer her to the right therapist or go through the ASHA (American Speech and Hearing association) website to find a certified SLP. Your mom sounds like a perfect candidate!
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Try googling "assistive communication boards" to see if you think that would be helpful - there are also videos on YouTube to show how they work. There are great communication apps available for iPads.

(edit) There are some good videos put out by ALS Philadelphia detailing communication options for people with that disease so they are aimed at helping adults. I would think that an OT should be able to help you find and try some of these options.
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Yes - if you Google "voice amplifiers for Parkinson's" you will see a range of specially designed gadgets. Whether or not the claims made for them are justified... :/

Only one way to find out! Maybe see if you can "try before you buy"?
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Poor lady! That would be very frustrating. Would it be possible to ask her doctor to order occupational therapy? Perhaps the OT would have ideas about devices she could use to communicate, or even have some she could try. Or, searching online I see that Parkinson.org recommends consulting a speech-language pathologist for speech problems, and mentions assistive communication devices as being one way to deal with problems speaking.

I sure hope you can find some ways to help your mom communicate better.
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