My husband has COPD and he's in hospice. What can I expect?

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He is seeing things that are not there. Is on oxygen all the time.He will dose off when I'm there. He is hard to understand. He is in bed all the time.

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I'm sorry. As much as we know that we'll all die, it's never easy to go through it with someone we love. Work closely with hospice staff. The idea is not to prolong life but to help the natural death process occur. Meanwhile, keeping the patient comfortable is the priority. Depending on how far into the death process your husband is, he may sleep a lot. Then, as was mentioned, hold his hand, talk to him, but don't worry about him sleeping. Each person is different. The idea is not to artificially prolong pain and misery.
Take care of yourself, too, which will mean taking breaks.
Carol
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Just continue to love him and when you think you can't stay awake any longer, love him with kind words and hold his hand...Its only a small part of our lives...when he is gone, you can't do it anymore.
He may not respond, but he knows........my 97 yr old dad just passed 9/15 and I want to hold his hand now......did i tell him I loved him enough??? I wish he were still here so i could...
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My husband has been sleeping for two yrs nearly all day from his stroke and medical side effects even waking to eat or go to toilet makes him go into sessur then deep sleep healing prosses dyeing prossesswho knows I hold his hand I strok his head when he's loaly I am there for him he can't see can't talk and is unable to move hafe his body but I am here all his friends are so busy with life doing good doing bad and doing for them self closing there eyes on a friend who needs them depressing no its life and how ßome people face it by turning away just do what you can he knows you love him
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My father fought COPD for many years. In the end in hospice, it was determined that the oxygen mask was doing more harm than good, really not working any more, in other words, causing him to struggle more than if he didn't have it. They removed the oxygen. Soon after this when he would struggle to breathe he was given drops that relaxed his lungs, keeping him from pain, but slowly letting his body shut down. This is not a very technical explanation but only what I remember. After they remove the oxygen it will be very close to his time. It has been 5 years since I lost my father, so I would ask the nurse or doctor there if this is what they still do and if this would apply to your husband. Blessings to you and your loved ones.
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The best thing to do is to ask Hospice your questions as each Hospice case is different.
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My husband,with hospice, chf, hallucinated and began to sleep all the time until one afternoon he was gone,peacefully. Nurses said "it was all part of the dying process"
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If he is in Hospice care, you should ask this question to them, the professionals.
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Since he is on hospice, you can expect him to die within six months. That is the time frame one is given for having hospice.
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Six months is on the high end.
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