Is Mild Cognitive Impairment a precursor to Alzheimer's or Dementia?

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My soon to be 86 yr old Momma was just recently "diagnosed" with having Mild Cognitive Impairment. I live with my Momma and I'm with her almost 24/7. Her memory has slowly gotten worse over the last few weeks. She saw a Neurologist last Friday for the first time. Is this condition a precursor to Altheimer's and or Dementia? If it is, how can this condition ever get better in some people? I read up on some articles from Mayo Clinic and Altzheimers.com that seem to suggest that some people "get better".

Momma's memory issues in my humble opinion is anything but "mild". I still feel like I'm in the dark about her condition and what I should be prepared to face.

Can someone help me out please?

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I tend to think that a diagnosis of MCI is really just a way to say "we see some decline but we don't know why". It's much better for the docs to make a diagnosis of MCI, which might be nothing at all or early dementia, than to diagnose dementia or alzheimer's and later be proven wrong.
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My mother has this and I think it is just another name for mild dementia. She is currently taking Namenda, but I have to tell her the same things about every four hours or so because she forgets all about it during that time. She is also taking acetyl l carnitine, memory formulas, and ALA. Have just started both parents on Creatine - doctors was surprised that I knew about it and approved. I suspect that the supplements are doing more good than the prescribed drugs.
We had more luck with her family doctor taking it seriously than the neurologist.
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And check for a urinary tract infection. In the elderly UTI's can mimic dementia. Thank goodness there are infections that can be cured. Alzheimer's and many other dementia are not curable, do not get better, only much, much worse. Get her checked by her PCP, full blood workup, urinalysis, any other tests the doctor recommends, to determine if the dementia symptom may be caused by something other than brain misfunction.
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I think often the early symptom of dementia are so subtle and occur so gradually that we don't notice until they are fairly advanced, especially if we are with that person often. The fact that you mom seems to have deteriorated noticeably over the last few weeks make me wonder if there may be something else going on. I would be asking for a physical check up, including blood work, to rule out other causes.
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Lyndee my mom definitely has mild to moderate cognitive impairment. I haven't taken her to get diagnosed, because I don't think there's anything to do. She has virtually no short-term memory. She turned 96 this week and has been very stable in the last five years or so in terms of her cognitive ability. She's able to live alone in independent living (with a LOT of help from me). She has a daily routine and that keeps her grounded and able to manage. She reads and does her crossword puzzles. But she can't remember my brother called her 30 minutes after his call. She can't remember how old she is or what year it is or who the president is, but she can remember my dad's Air Force number from 40 years ago. So dementia/cognitive impairment is a very individual thing and may not lead to Alzheimers. I just keep a very close eye on my mom and try to help her manage as much as possible.
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To assandache7 and JessieBelle, no my Momma was not given any medications or patches. The Neurologist assessed Momma's diagnosis solely based on asking questions. No blood work or Cat Scans of Momma's brain was ordered by this Neurologist. Momma can be re-evaluated in 6 months if need be. All the Neurologist said was she is to continue to read and do crossword puzzles. Maybe if her symptoms get worse, further testing will be warranted and maybe some medication.

I might be able to find out if Momma can take Vitamins B12 and D3 and E. Momma is already taking a daily vitamin.
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Lyndee, MCI can be early stages of dementia or it could be something else entirely. You may want the doctor to do a complete blood workup to see how her vitamins are. Vitamins B12 and D3 are often too low in older people. Taking supplements helps a lot. My mother was low on both, so I give her B12 every day and D3 three times a week. Her levels are now normal. I also give her Vitamin E because I heard it may help.

In my mother's case I can't say that it has helped her thinking. She was far into the disease before I started the vitamins. I know having the right amount is beneficial, though, so I'm glad I started. Ask your mother's doctor if she thinks these things would help.
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Did her prescribe any medication?

There are drugs that can lessen the symptons for early to mid stages..

I would describe mild cognitive impairment as dementia..
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