How do you meet the dental care needs of an Alzheimer's patient?

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My 96-year old mother lives with advanced Alzheimer's Disease. She no longer leaves the house due to high anxiety and confusion. So I can no longer take her to a dentist for routine dental exams and care. Despite her age, she has all her own teeth and has never had dental problems. I am nevertheless concerned. Does anyone have any suggestions? Are there things I can do at home to promote her oral health?

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Get some sponge toothbrushes from an oral surgeon. They are gentle. What you don't want to happen is a dental emergency.
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There are sponge toothbrushes with toothpaste in them. May make brushing easier.
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I would take any measures I could to keep her dental health good. Recently, my loved one saw a dentist and it was not good news. While years ago she received dental care and had gotten some fillings and even a crown and bridge, lately her dental care was no good. She had not had dental care in the last few years. Apparently, she was not brushing or flossing either. She has gum disease to the point that she has to have gum surgery. (They will use a local anesthetic.) She is under palliative medical care and I wish this procedure could be avoided, but there's no other option. Even with the surgery, they will have to pull a few teeth too. If it isn't treated, she could get abscesses and/or her teeth fall out.

I would meet with a dentist who treats dementia patients frequently and try to come up with a plan. I realize your mom is 96, but I would still work in order to avoid something like oral surgery.
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Yes. Brush her teeth with a baking soda and peroxide mixture. Rinse with salt water. Better than toothpaste and nothing is dangerous if swallowed (Actually, I'm not sure how dangerous toothpaste would be if swallowed....) Floss every day. This is most important. You can also ask her dentist for a prescription for Peridex. This is a great antibiotic for the mouth. They give it to you after extraction to prevent infection. It kills germs. My mom's dentist told me using it would help her keep her teeth a little longer (poor care in the nursing home; I supplement.) Either she can rinse with the Peridex or you can use a cotton ball to rub the Peridex gently on her teeth and gums. It will slightly discolor her teeth, in that they will be less white, but for my case, using this about twice a week, the benefit outweighs the risk. You might also ask her dentist about this: periogen.com. I've heard good things. A baking soda and water rinse after meals neutralizes the acid that causes cavities. Anything you're able to do is better than nothing, and it all helps. Even warm water rinses after means. Good luck to you. If you have a serious dental emergency, call 911. The EMTs will be skilled at helping get your mom out of the house and transported to the emergency dental clinic at the hospital. You might ever do research first to see which hospital has a dental clinic. That way, when the ambulance comes, you can tell them where to take you.
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There are dentists who travel by van complete with all the equipment they need. But as the person before me stated, sometimes the patient cooperates and sometimes she doesn't. My husband bit the finger of the dentist, so he refused to treat my husband any longer I still had to pay the fee.So once I could no longer take him, he couldn't get his teeth checked an longer. Another loss to Alzheimer's disease. His breath was not good, he began to spit a lot, but we can only do what we can do. Each Allzhemer patient is unique!
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In NJ there are dentists who will make house calls. My mother's dentist charges $250 for a cleaning. He brings portable equipment and is kind and gentle with her. He does the best job he can given the circumstances. Sometimes she cooperates and sometimes she doesn't.
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You might want to use baby toothpaste as it is formulated to be swallowable. I get this at my local healthfood store. If she is clamping her mouth closed, consider using toothettes. I get these from my local family owned pharmacy which has a strong durable goods caregiving department, but I suspect regular pharmacies might have them too.
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Arnie, if Mom won't leave the house - is it possible to find a dentist or hygenist that will make a house call? If not, I would work on the basics. Brushing her teeth (Likely you will have to do this for her). Flossing. Have her rinse with mouth wash - but you have to watch that she spits it out. I had to watch my mom like a hawk with this and tell her to spit it out. Dementia patients can get funny about their teeth so be prepared that such a regimen may not be possible all the time! Just hope for the best. If true brushing becomes impossible, try for rinsing with warm water - especially before bed time.
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