Information gathering as a caregiver. Is there a list of information I should have on hand for my FIL's care?

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Does anyone know of a list of information I should have on hand for my FIL that we are caring for? We have the basics (medical information, driver's license), but I am sure there is much more out there that we should be putting together as he needs more care. I just want to make sure we are well organized.

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Been over a year since I was in that role - Dad passed away, but excellent suggestions for all the things you need to have on hand. 

Yes all the meds, the special needs, the hospitalization and surgery history (and outcomes)... all of their conditions... eventually you just keep everything handy. I had it all on paper printouts, just found it easier to pull out and give to someone if they needed it. Every ER admitter asked for meds and hospitalization history. 

My Dad had swallowing problems and had to have his bed at a 30 degree min angle even in the ER. I made signs for the walls and door of his room. The nurses are so busy and as shifts change, things can happen and sometimes they just don't notice. Such vigilance and attention to detail is something we all have to have. Preferences and routines are important too. 

I would only add, Keep a Log -all the time... Names, dates, phone nos, etc. ( Oh I see that someone else has mentioned this.) Yes, when, where who...You will need to refer to it. I had a notebook. (Ended up a whole stack of notebooks.) Kept logs of weight, water, what food ingested, nighttime wakeups, urine amounts, etc. etc....(This was at home also.) Which nurses were in his hospital room, any events that were important, what the Drs said... Not to sue but just to be able to remind myself and tell others what was going on with him.
I also thought it was necessary due to one family member who was a little mentally disturbed and somewhat dangerous. That issue is over now that he has passed. 

Many many jobs we have in this role. Bless all caregivers.
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Staceyp13: You're very welcome! Yes, you COULD put it on a computer spreadsheet. Just make sure to back it up on an external hard drive in case it's lost. That way the external hard drive will have the info. Okay?
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Thank you all so much! The information you have given is so very valuable and has eased a lot on my mind as to how and what to organize. Much appreciated!
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I strongly agree with those who suggested keeping the information in the computer. Put it in sections in the computer, such as medications surgeries, bank accounts, credit cards, etc. , and date each separate item, such as a meds list. When you update an item, put in the update date. If you are not computer-savvy yourself, get someone to help you put it in in a word processing program, such as Microsoft Word, or some parts in a spreadsheet, such as Excel. In most situations, the main things you will need are lists of medications, illnesses, and surgeries. These are very easy to update--much easier than doing it by hand with lots of re-writing, crossing out, etc. I haven't looked recently, but there are probably some programs designed to store this information, in which case things should be even simpler to do. I am 73 myself, completely responsible for myself (no children nor reliable siblings), and I've been doing this record-keeping in the computer for about 10 years. As you update key lists, you can print them out for current use. Things like bank accounts and credit cards are needed in hard copy very seldom; and should be fine most of the time in computerized form. I deliberately haven't mentioned phone apps because I myself have difficulties with my hands and cannot use a smart phone, but my guess is there are probably some apps you could use for much of this work.
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All excellent suggestions. I would add a couple of things:

1) Test drive that POA at a bank. They all seem to fax it to a legal department. (My mother's POA has been declined 4 times last week because the wording does not give me authority "to open" a savings account separate from our joint checking. Also checking for the wording "to close" such as in the case of a matured CD)
2) If he served in the military, have a copy of his DD-214 and his dates of service.
3) Have a copy of his ID. (Going back to the POA, the reasons varied for the rejections)
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List for FIL:
#1 All doctors' full names, POB, contact info and who may be allowed to consult with them, e.g, family member (pref) or friend.
#2 All bank information
#3 All insurance information
#4 All health diagnoses
#5 All illnesses
#6 All hospitalizations
#7 All medical equipment needed (bedside commode, cane, walker, rollator walker, magnifying machine if Macular Degeneration patient)
#8 List of all meds
#9 Two cassette cases for day and night meds
#10 All known food allergies
#11 All food and liquids that are needed for said patient
#12 Activity list
#13 HIPPA doc
#14 Prepaid funeral paperwork done and executed
#15 All known drug allergies

For yourself:
Name and address of current psychiatrist
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springwell.com
Has a comprehensive, easy to type in info on your computer and print out and create a very useful caregiver workbook. Covers most things. I do not keep my financial info in this book, but with my child, and the rest is kept and can be updated as needed. Check it out.
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Good, good answers! One thing, though, about DNRs: You will need one for out-of-hospital and one at the hospital that the person normally uses.
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No one has mentioned a document that is truly beneficial and complete to have: The FIVE WISHES. This covers all the answers ahead of time which the person may not be able to provide once they are not able to answer for themselves.

"Five Wishes is America’s most popular living will because it’s written in everyday language and helps people express their wishes in areas that matter most — the personal and spiritual in addition to the medical and legal. It also helps you describe what good care means to you, whether you are seriously ill or not. It allows your caregiver to know exactly what you (the patient) want."
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CeeCee

Abducted by aliens list.....

Excellent
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