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I'm looking for a GPS for my loved one. I find it hard to believe the devices I find on email often require someone to punch a panic button. Not sure that a person with Alzheimer's has that ability. Medic alerts also require some type of ability to call for help or a panic button. Not sure my loved one would remember to do that. Most devices are not always with the person, i.e. at night when they have retired for the evening. I researched and bought one, but it works hit and miss. Any suggestions?

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Some Alzheimer's Association also have locator services with law enforcement. A chip is embedded in a sneaker. If the LO strays from the home, law enforcement can locate them via the chip in the shoe and deploy assistance. There is no charge to the family.
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Automatic Fall Detection For Seniors

Most traditional medical alert monitoring systems rely on a pendant or button that your loved one must press in order to call for help. These systems are highly effective and save lives every day.

Some seniors, though, are at a higher risk of falling than others. There is the possibility that when your loved one falls, they may be unable to press their medical alert button to call for help. This is where Automatic Fall Detection comes in.
From the company called "Medical Guardian"--
Automatic fall detection technology is a newcomer to the medical alert monitoring industry and it’s not without some controversy, since they can’t detect 100% of all falls. Read our most frequently asked questions in regards to medical alert devices with fall detection to learn more.
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My dad wears a pendant that he can either push the button on if he needs help or it will automatically summon help if it detects a fall. It has GPS tracking and we can see his location. It’s from Great Call. It does require charging and he could remove it, but we aren’t dealing with dementia and he likes wearing it and the added security it brings.
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This post got me curious. So I did the google search and found some interesting things, if all were true.
I went to three or four different site searching for "GPS tracking devices for adults." and found the same ten items list on each.
They ranged from the typical necklace to a device that is fitted into the shoe under the insole.
I even found one device that is listed by LoJack, the same company that that tracks stolen cars.
I hope this helps.
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Wow, there are a lot of options! Technology is wonderful. However, I think a person with AZ who doesn't know how to push a button on a pendant and call for help is kind of beyond the reach of the miracles of modern technology. They need 24/7 supervision and should be in a nursing home for their own safety.
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ShariK...be careful of the covers, while it might prevent him from getting out just be sure that there is an easy way out in an emergency.
A better idea might be a door alarm that you can put on the door so if it is opened you will be alerted.
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Speak with Medical Guardian. I am going to go back home to AZ and hopefully be able to talk Mom into this; concern is my 1 sister. Attorney stated that should I get Mom's permission, to have my sister sign a 'short letter' acknowledging that this will be paid for by me and that I will only have the ability to provide Medical assistance for Mom or Step-Father until she is contacted. That she also agrees to have me listed as a contact and able to get information should Mom end up in the hospital. That the agreement is between me and Medical Guardian, she cannot not nor anybody else make changes to the agreement, discontinue or have access to records without my permission.

This device can either be a bracelet or necklace. This company has their own trained 911 operators, so if you need any record of 911 calls, you do not need the Court to give you permission; IT IS YOUR ACCOUNT just like a banking account.

The device has a GPS contained within. It is also water proof so should the person fall in the bath tub/shower they can press for 911.

You will have access to the GPS like on a cellphone if you use the 360 app so family know exactly where you are on driving trips and know that you're home safe and sound.

The quote I got was $49.50 a month with a 3 month commitment of $149.00. There is only an agreement signed by you for this service. You do not have a contract. You do not have a fee for the services provided...GPS/911.

The call will go to the 911 operators, they contact you and it basically becomes a 3 way call. You provide them with a list of contacts in preference order in case they cannot contact you. In my case, any of my siblings should I decide will not be on that list.

I found this contained in one of the email letters AgingCare.com provides.
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My father wore a gps device that I purchased from "mygreatcall.com". It was waterproof and you can check online where the device is. It comes in either a pendant or a wristband. Luckily my father agreed to keep it on all the time. Unfortunately, the battery only lasts 2 to 3 days and then needs to be recharged for a few hours. What I did was purchase a 2nd device (was about $50 plus $35 activation fee) and then swap it every few days while the 2nd is being charged. There is a monitoring service fee of about $30/month. It is also a medic alert device that anyone would press the button on it they would call 911 and me, and whomever was designated. The phone # is 800 463 5412. It is also called a 5 star device.
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I use Sprint Family Locator at a cost of about $6. a month. As long as the person can carry their phone and it is charged it works wonderfully. I've used it numerous times and on a few times when my husband got away from me at Costco. It showed the whole parking lot when he was. Of course you have to have a cell phone to bring it up. Good luck
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These alert buttons are on a necklace. They can and should be worn are the time. There are saftey catches on them. They can be worn bathing. I think they have watch types too.
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I assume you are with him most of the time? Are u worried he will get out of the house. Because, GPS is only for tracking. Our local police Dept supplies ankle bracelets with a GPS. If a person wanders off, they can find them. If ur Police doesn't offer this service than try ur county Office of the aging. If your husband needs to be left alone than u may not be able to find anything he doesn't need to push a button or dial to get help. Phillips has an alert button that is motion activated. If a person falls and becomes uncounsious the button hitting the floor will alert the systems operator. They will come over the intercom and ask if the person is OK. If they get no response, an ambulance will be called.
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PS. The watch is too complicated for them to remove.
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My husband wears a GPS watch that I got through the Alzheimer's Association. It alerts you when he gets more than 200 yards from the base station. I can also look up on computer where he is in case he does manage to "escape." Google your local Alzheimer's Association store.
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It looks as if many devices are designed to summon outside aid if one falls rather than simply to provide the person's location to a responsible family member. It would seem reasonable that if a GPS could be somewhere on or inside the elder's shoe it would "have" to be worn unless the person wanders outside barefoot or without shoes.
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One more thing. We are going to put door knob covers (the one for baby protection) on the doors leading outside. I don't think he will be able to figure out how to open the door with them on. He and my Mil have dementia and are pretty clueless.
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We just experienced my father-in-law (93 yrs. old) getting lost on our property. We have 13 1/2 acres and some of it is undeveloped. The only reason we knew he was missing was because we have cameras set up at the house and can monitor his where abouts. My mother-in-law, who is 92 and wheelchair bound, was freaking out and we didn't see him on any of the cameras. My husband went over to see what was going on and realized his dad was missing. We are talking about 10 minutes of time had passed when my mil started freaking out. We searched the parts of the property that we could and when we realized we couldn't find him, we call 911. 3 1/2 hours later, he was found in the back corner of the property in a wooded area by a police dog. Thank God for these tracking dogs!!! I applaud our Sheriff department for their compassion during those trying hours. FIL was confused and had wandered into the wooded area and fallen down and couldn't get up. If it hadn't been for the cameras, we wouldn't have known there was an issue.
The cameras cost about $40 each and are easy to hook up to your WIFI. There is an app for your phone and you can check on them anytime. It swivels 360, has sound and motion detection (optional). Great product!!

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TENVIS HD IP Camera - Wireless IP Camera with Two-way Audio, Night Vision Camera, 2.4GHz & 720P Camera for Pet Baby Monitor, Home Security Camera Motion Detection Indoor Camera with Micro SD Card Slot.
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There are phones that you can track if your loved one carries the phone all the time that might work.
My Husband wandered a few times and the Police suggested that I contact the Mental Health Department where I am, they have a program called Care Trak and it is a watch like device that is worn on the wrist. A profile is done of the person, a photo is taken and this info is given to the police. When the person goes missing you call 911, tell the dispatcher that they are on Care Trak. The police set up a "command station" with all the info they have and an officer goes around in the car with an antenna that is set up to pick up the signal from the device. I was told this is better than GPS as the signal does not get lost if the person enters an area where signals are not clear.
the person with the device does have to be under 24 hour watch though. You can not leave them alone to go to the store, to work. It is for anyone that can not easily communicate. A person with dementia, autism are the perfect candidates.
There is also the collars that are put on dogs, you can set an acceptable range and you will be sent an alert if the collar is past the pre set boundary. I think the device can be removed from a collar and put on a belt, key chain.
And I have seen tracking devices that are placed in shoes.
Some of these have a monthly cost.
The Care Trak, I had to check the battery daily, log the checks and we had to go to the office 1 time a month to have the battery changed.

Easiest thing would be to check with your local police or county sheriff. If nothing else they would probably like to know that there is a potential that you may be calling for a wandering adult with dementia. I have found that they are nothing but helpful and understanding.
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Try your local sheriff's department. Ours has a program called Operation Lifesaver. It's a bracelet that they wear around their wrist or ankle and has a GPS. It cost $10.00 per month to monitor and there are some conditions. I hope this helps you. You can Google the program.
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Adding, after reading Sunnygirl's comment about people who've lain on the floor b/c they weren't their pendant and couldn't call, that's why a device which activates on positional change is necessary. My father's has activated when he's leaned over in the chair to take a nap. It apparently is quite sensitive to changes in position.
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My father's medic alert pendant doesn't require him to push the button if he falls. He's been called repeatedly when he changes position and the alarm alerts at the monitoring station. Once he was even called when he was at the VA hospital, miles away from his home.

You're correct that the devices aren't always carried with the person at night, so what has to be done is place the device close to the person so it can be reached. But that could be an issue for someone with dementia who doesn't understand that the button has to be pushed.

The individual doesn't have to call, though. An emergency protocol is established when the contract is signed, listing first, second and third orders of emergency notification. So if my father doesn't answer when the monitoring service responds to a change in position, or if he pushes the button accidentally, I'm the first to be called. If I'm not available, EMS would be called as secondary.

It can also be on the charger at that time b/c it needs to be charged regularly.

The nighttime solution isn't optimum, but it's the best we've worked out so far.
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I'm sure there is a product out there that would work for you. I have a small device on my dog's collar (she's a runner).  I get an email and text if she leaves our property. I can then track her on my phone. I have it set up to use at two locations because we go to our RV on weekends. When we leave our house I get a text that she has left the house and when we get to the RV I get a text that she is at the RV. It has a small monthly fee and is very user friendly.
If you google trackers for Alzheimer's patients you will get some ideas. The Alzhermers.net site has suggestions
www.alzheimers.net/8-8-14-location-devices-dementia/ Good Luck!
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I don't have any suggestions, but, I was just curious as to how you ensure the person has the tracking device on their person. I mean, if they wear it as a pendent, they can take it off or discard it if in their pocket. I'm just curious. And you are right about the Medical Alert devices. I've known several people who had them, but, they forgot how to use it and laid on the floor for hours, not remembering they could press the button for help. I do think they have ones now that go off if the person is lying in a horizontal position. It's still so risky though.  I still think that direct supervision is the safest route. Is yours intended for nighttime use?
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