How many hours of sleep is recommended for a dementia patient?

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BTW quotes should have been added on above....." A caregiver's bill of rights......thru ......recognize the limits of my own endurance and strength".....want to give the credits.....originally from "Caregiving, Helping An Aging Loved One" by Jo Horne, Washington DC; AARP Books, 1985, page 299.
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From: A Caregiver's Bill of Rights, I have the right (1) to take care of myself....(2) to seek help from others even thought my relative may object. I recognize the limits of my own endurance and strength.....there's more.....for now tho'! I encourage you to make that appt and why do you even need to tell her......just say you going to see the Dr for your own health. That is true and she doesn't need to know any more. Also there are books out there.....I got them from the library.....that helped me with this very issue.........realizing I needed to "take care of ME" or I wouldn't be any good to anyone else.....it's definitely a process.....so I didn't do it perfectly either........hope this helps some.
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I sadly don't get the chance to see a doc on my own. Because we can be kept waiting I just couldn't guarantee I could stay long enough and they get pissy if you leave before you have seen a doc.....like it is only their life that matters! As for Mum letting me see the doc on my own .... aint ever gonna happen. We even tried me seeing the doc while she had a blood test - nope she demanded I went with her. Sighs dependency can be a b*tch
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One tho't for ohJude.........someone suggested we talk to our Mom's DR at separate appt (called a consultation) so we could get the help & med's we needed! I didn't know that was an option! The DR was great and caring AND was always in-out within 10min's or LESS when we saw him WITH her. We always had to MAKE a list of Qs ahead or NOT get the help and answers we needed! THE consultation helped greatly BC we were the ones who needed support and help to not only DEAL with her anxiety and behavior issues but to make our caregiving more EFFECTIVE too! SADLY the medical field is not there to assist the caregivers......and YET it really is a TEAM effort. Not sure the medical industry realizes that yet!? Bottom line......we, as caregivers, are left to find the resources and strategies that work for each of us in our given situation. I can only offer this now from hindsight.......because my in-laws (mom and dad) are now safe in the nursing home that is needed for them at this stage of their "dementia's".......and they BOTH are adjusting better than we expected! This was a long road (5 plus years--lost track) of me being the KEY support/caregiver for my SO/sig-other who was the primary/live-in/caregiver for his mom and dad 24 /7. I have my own place 1/2 hr away.....and would not have survived this emotionally or mentally any other way. I was there 5-7 days a week for the last 2 yrs. for 3-8hrs at a time. AND we had medical home-care AND hskpg-home-care the last year and a half....which helped enormously. Social workers, I found, are the best sources of help for listening to me and directing me as a caregiver's-caregiver-in-crisis to the info/sources we needed......hope this helps some.
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As far as i know Neither I nor my husband suffer from dementia but we never had the normal sleep patterns of the average worker.both of us worked shift jobs where we had the night shift 10:00 P.M.or 12:00 to 8:30for so many-years or the after noon which all most all the new people who worked where we did were put on ,a 3;00 P.M. to when ever depending on the time of the year how much over time was needed. Even the so called day shift started at 4:00A.M. till noon and during the rush times we could be expected to come in as early as midnight. Saying that neither if us has ever had a normal sleep schedule. So I am not surprised to be wide awake at all hours, as long as we are both safe and not falling down or burning food or water we should be fine. Each person on this list needs to find ways to help their family member with out burning out themselves. Medications can help but some times it is best to have a second person with you at night , whose job is to be with your loved one , so you the main provider can feel safe to sleep.All it takes is your loved one to get out of bed at night and fall to change their life forever.
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Beth: No hanging you....YOU"RE NEEDED!
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I think those patients who don't sleep should be medicated. I don't want to cat nap all day. More concern should be given to the health of the care giver. In all reality, the patient's healthy days are gone. Keep them comfortable, be kind. Do what you can. But they need to sleep at night when I do. So hang me!!
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I always warn people about melatonin. For myself, and for my Dad, it is good in small doses, larger doses can produce lethargy and nightmares.
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Maybe if you Don't turn the t.v off but suggest to her to lower the volume, that might help, she obviously feels comfortable in front of it and I know for my mom she doesn't like to be alone, no matter how tired she is if she's by herself in her room she'll get up to be wherever someone is. So the tv might give her a feeling of not being alone, she does sleep with it on you said.
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Elderly people get up very early (it's nuts, since they have nothing to do) and are sleeping in a chair all day long!
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