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Parent diagnosed some years ago, along with Parkinsons. My parent just sits and either sleeps or stares off in space, in her recliner in our family room. Not interested in T.V, any craft, book, movie,drawing, music, talking, etc. Just says wants to sleep all day if possible. Has lost weight very quickly also?

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My husband died from Alzheimer's after 13/15 years. It is very difficult to exactly point the commencement of this disease. It goes on progressively, but by the time you got a thorough examination (scans and various testing of memory, concentration, etc..) you are already min. 2 to 3 years with the disease. As far as Parkinson is concerned, I have no experience, but the final stage of Alzheimer is no more talking, not recognizing anyone, incontinence, just staring and sleeping, only accepting fluid food, no more reactions to kissing or caressing, etc.. The last 6 months, he was just a living plant. I have prayed a lot that there would soon come an end to this... And when they phoned me to say he was at the very end, I of course was extremely sad and have cried out my eyes for days and weeks. On the other hand I was so thankful that it was over. The worst thing is that they even can not say any more whether they are in pain or not. Certainly do not allow tube feeding... It is only an unnecessary prolongation of pain and sorrow. Wish you a lot of strength to overcome this hard time, and try to think of yourself from time to time. If you can not go for several days, don't bother too much. They don't know / realize it any more. With a big hug.. and with best wishes for 2016
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My Mom, 93, has been pretty unresponsive for over a year now. She is completely bedridden in my home. She does answer questions with a yes or no...sometimes both...and has not been eating more than a few bites for 3 months now. She sleeps most of the time or stares at the TV or magazines and newspapers. She has been on hospice for 6 months and they have been a great help. Medicare pays for hospice. The one thing that I do not agree with are those booklets with the timelines they give. Some of the symptoms that say the patient has 2-3 months or 1-2 weeks Mom has had symptoms for a year to a year and a half. Sometimes these end of life symptoms have come and gone. Maybe she is just different than most people, doctors gave her 6 months to 2 yrs. to live....13 years ago after an inoperable cancer diagnosis.
Going through this has been exhausting but things got so much better when hospice came on board. I would recommend calling for an evaluation at least.
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My husband died three years ago, after a 10-year journey with Lewy Body Dementia. (Parkinson's also involves Lewy bodies in the brain, so there are similarities.) He was on hospice for 5 weeks. During that period the amount of time he was awake decreased steadily. He had no pain. Some days he ate and some days he didn't. He enjoyed popsicles when he was awake. He was lucid to the end -- in fact, he seemed in some ways more lucid than he had been. The morning of his death he ate his favorite breakfast and read the newspaper. He slept most of the day. In the evening while I was reading to him he became agitated and was showing the signs of dying listed in the hospice booklet. We had just time to tell each other I love you and then he was gone.

I think the dying process is consistent enough that the typical activities can be written up and predicted, but unique enough to each individual that we cannot know exactly what to expect.

Confused24, I think a hospice evaluation is in order. Even if it is not time yet, having that connection will be helpful.
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I agree, get her evauated. It will be good for you. Medicare pays for everything, diapers included. You can have an aide and nurse comes in every so many days. With my grandmother, she ended up in the fetal position which is an Alzheimers thing. Remember people Dementia an Alzherimers are two different things. Yes both considered a dementia but causes are different.
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Edwardcaretaker, that's so sad. I do feel for you. That's tough. So young too. My cousin was 62 when she was first diagnosed with VD mixed with AD. She has come down hill so quickly. Prognosis for VD seems to be much shorter in survival from what I have read. I never know what to expect. She now has severe dementia, but still talks and eats.
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Hmm, 5 years? When noticed 5 years. This last year was all down hill. In bed, no moving or talking. Can get a smile when I kiss her (it's my wife) but that's it. FTD version. She's only 68.
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It does sound the final stage. Confused, may I ask how long she has had dementia?
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Final--they stop eating. I was told that the body doesn't want food so it's not like "you" are starving the person. Let the person pass! No tubes. This will be the worst final days but you will know they will finally have peace.
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Consider home hospice evaluation, just in case.
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Confused24, I found this article here in Aging Care that will be helpful for your question regarding the final stages of Alzheimer's/Dementia.

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/Stages-of-Alzheimers-disease-118964.htm
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