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Mild stroke last month but does have A-fib and is obese. Losing a pound a day so he understands the nutrition part but always has an excuse about the oxygen.

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Can the concentrator be moved to the top of the stairs and can you connect several straight oxygen hoses with connectors for up to 100 feet? Ask your DME provider if they have this. You have a sat monitor and 100 feet should not require any adjustment in flow. I do not have an idea on if this is enough to get him to complete work tasks in the business. It is an option. I saw a carpenter drill a hole between floors and threaded tubing through to allow more movement for his daughter. FYI those people in the study of the 5 year level the study stopped but half of the surfing users lived past that time frame
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A mouth breather. That maybe the problem. My husband is a mouth breather to. If you can't breath thru your nose, then how do they expect u to use the tubes. Maybe he would to better with a mask?

I never had to carry tanks around for Mom. She had portable oxygen. It was supplied by in home. She used the bigger machine when home. The large tanks were provided but only used if she lost electricity.
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May I share some more observations and experience, especially with carrying tanks?

This may harm either or both of you in the long run.   Back in 2004, I carried E tanks, plus a walker and a wheelchair as backup.  Although I had a wonderful Ford Escort station wagon at the time, there still was a lot of lifting involved.   I never thought much about it.

Fast forward, now I have back problems.  I don't know how much of it can be attributed to leaning forward, or gardening, but I think oxygen tanks made a significant contribution.  Leaning in and out of a station wagon's cargo area, as well as a sedan's back seat and trunk, took a toll over time.

Get a back brace to wear when you carry the E tanks.  And the behemoth, which I think is the concentrator as opposed to a portable tank, is a very heavy piece of equipment. 

Ask your health care provider to script for E tanks, as well as the smaller portable ones although they only have a 2 hour capacity.  The portable tanks fit onto a roller, and you can haul them behind you as you walk although they do have to be lifted into a vehicle.

If you can get the ones with interchangeable battery cartridges, they're a lot more versatile and easy to handle than the heavier E tanks.
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coolieslady13 Mar 18, 2021
Didn't think about a back brace which I have. Thank you. We do have the roller for the tanks but it still has to be carried up & downstairs. And the behemoth is the concentrator. I am only carrying it for now or he would just stay in bed all day. He does now understand the portables wont last forever. We get our monthly portables delivery in a few days. I gave him the life expectancy info you wrote & and he immediately put his mask back on & said Whaaat?. His face was one of those "priceless" expressions. Thank you.
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You are in some sort of conundrum here. If he is competent then he can take it off as his own decision just like he can refuse taking pills. The long term studies going on for many years goes like this. For those who wore it all the time, it doubled life expectency (based in terms of oxygen wearers for 5 years) For those who did not wear it life expectency was cut to half of that. Oxygen wearers for cardiac reasons did not follow that pattern. If he is losing a lot of weight then reduction of oxygen need may follow.
Do realize that wearing oxygen requires a lifestyle change and the burdon of limiting mobility plus carrying tanks around is quite high. Garden Artist does have a point that some people will be back to the emergency room if the need is great. Some people need to trip a couple of times.
If he is not competent, then consider that oxygen use is a comfort measure. Look at how he breathes and determine if he looks more "winded" Also if he is not competent then there is no reasoning with him. Just put it back on with no drama.
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coolieslady13 Mar 18, 2021
He is competent. He also was a very active man before his stroke. He wanted to go to work the day after he came home from the hospital. He also was the "domestic" one of us so it's now up to me to clean, cook, etc. Not complaining but yes it is a lifestyle change for both. We live on the 2nd floor and I have to carry the tanks when he doesn't sneak down first. We saw our FNP yesterday and she noticed he's a mouthbreather and gave him a mask. I do understand he's got to get used to it but when he takes it off he won't switch over to the other one and goes without. (24/7) Pulse ox fluctuates from 94 to 88 and back again. Sometimes as low as 77. We are adjusting as needed. FNP has also now told him to slow down, quit rushing everything and quit trying to carry the oxygen. His portable tanks are empty now and we have to bring down the "Behemooth" as I call it when he comes down. We live in a tourist town and live above the store we work in so he likes to come down to help but the owner and I tell him no just sit there! The info you provided might help except it is a heart issue at the moment. Trying to strengthen his heart. FNP explained to him it's like his heart sprang a leak and he needs to avoid springing another leak for now because he probably wouldn't survive another leak right now. Very hardheaded and unfortunately he has lost some brain function. Nothing major really. He just doesn't compute as fast or like he used to. He has to be "reminded" a lot and not just short term things. Once he is "reminded" like where we keep something he's good. That could improve with time.
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Wish I had a good answer, but I don't.  It's hard to adjust to the tube in one's nose.

One thing you can check is to see if there's abrasion behind the ears.  If so, ask the DME oxygen supplier for the little ear wraps.   Ours were some kind of soft rubber (?) plastic (?), that fit over the cannula at the ears.   It helps avoid friction against the skin which can be an irritant and increase the resistance to use the oxygen.

Is he on oxygen 24/7?   At what level?   If he refuses to use it, there will come a point at which his oxygen sat levels decline, and he'll need it more, and might in fact end up back at his pulmonologist's office, or in the ER.  

I would get a good pulse ox to test his SAT levels and monitor them, so you can tell if they're worsening b/c he's not wearing his oxygen.   If you do have to rush back to his pulmonologist, or to the ER, that information will be very helpful to them.  And someone might just give him a very blunt lecture about using oxygen.
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coolieslady13 Mar 18, 2021
Wrapped them up when he came home for the sores. FNP gave him a mask as he appears to be a mouth breather. Pulse ox varies from the 90's to the 70's rapidly. When I tell him to chill/relax breath deep and evenly it'll settle down but still varies by a few points. FNP has us adjusting the oxygen depending on the pulse ox. Talk about a challenge. I did give him the life expectancy info that MACinCt gave me and he immediately put his mask back on and said Whaaaat?! Oxygen is 24/7 for now. The rest remains to be seen.
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