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Hello. My dad is 72 years old. Since more than one year he is experiencing several symptoms which are typical of a dementia condition like Alzheimer although he does not have some others that are as well important for such a diagnosis. He is being checked by a neurologist and psychologist but it would help me if someone has experienced similar cases and can provide good advises. The main symptoms are:
- loss of short term memory: sometimes he asks the same question that he has asked a few minutes before
- he does not participate to conversations, he is very passive for example when we seat around the table with relatives or friends
- he says that sometimes he knows well the word for something but he cannot simply say it
- he says that he prefers to stay home because he is afraid that people will ask him questions and then he will not be able to reply
- sometimes he starts telling a story but he cannot complete it
- very often he puts his hands on his head and/or face to cover them and does nothing but rubbing his head/face
- sometimes you ask him why he wants to do something and he replies "I don't know, I don't have anything to say"

He has no problems with walking or recognizing people or finding the way home. He had a major heart problem some years ago an he takes quite a lot of medicines, so maybe this plays also a role.

I don't know whether he has first symptoms of Alzheimer or if he has a serious form of depression (or both).

If some of you has experienced a similar situation, would be great if you could share some good advises or tips.

Thank you!

Mike

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Thanks for the kind reply.
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Mike, I've seen this but don't have enough experience with dementia to say that it is a harbinger, beginning or symptom. I've also experienced loss of words and mental blocks myself when I'm especially tired, nervous or anxious.

It does seem though as if your father is aware of his condition, and is saddened and humbled by it. I'm not sure whether it rises to the level of depression - I don't have that much experience with age related depression.

I'm glad he's being seen by a neurologist, for his sake as well as yours.

There are many others here with extensive experience who I'm sure will post when they see your questions. Their answers will most likely be more informative than mine.

Best wishes for you and your father.



Speaking only to the nonparticipation in conversations though, it's also possible he has some hearing loss and can't adequately hear or respond to conversations.
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