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My mom has been relatively stable for a few years (she's 74) after being diagnosed with dementia . She has of course no short-term memory, needs cues to take a bath, brush her teeth, etc., forgets appointments but not people. Nothing too terrible yet. Today, she came in my room and seriously asked, "are we going to go get the rest of the the stuff from the other house?" I was confused as she has lived right here in THIS house for at least 50 years. I then realized she was talking about the house she lived with her grandmother when she came out to CA from Boston at age 11. She even knew the address. I just didn't know what to say to that. But I just told her she hasn't lived at that place for over 50 years and that she "must have had a dream or something"....to downplay it. I am really scared that this could mean she is going to get a lot worse fast now. She is only 74! I guess I'm looking for reassurance that this is normal and expected...I'm not ready for anything worse just yet.

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Thanks to everyone who answered, your kind words and thoughts are so appreciated. There is still a lot I need to learn about dementia. I am so grateful for this board. BTW, mom hasn't mentioned the "old house" thing again so far. Next time, I plan on taking the advice here and going with it. I thought before that doing that would confuse her even more, but I realize that whatever I do say she will forget anyway. Dementia and Alzheimer's are truly cruel diseases.
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Sometimes the kindest & most merciful thing you can do is tell them what they seem to want to hear.

It's totally OK. It's not manipulative because the person isn't going to use this information to make life decisions or spend money, or do something where they could be injured in any way.

I have heard, and seen in my own mother and other family, that as dementia progresses, the person seems to go back in time. They may think they are a child again, and expect to be around people who were alive back then in places they used to go. My mom sees pets she used to have back in the 1940s - she's 78 this year.
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Akaheba, we have exactly the same thing occurring here. My mom has lived in this house for more than 50 years yet is always concerned about her things and if the other house is locked. She worries that someone will come in during the night when we are sleeping. She wonders where her suitcase is. She does not recognize 50 years of her belongings in her house. Sometimes I telll her that I have checked the locks on the other house, others I ask her "doesn't this look like all your things" still other times I tell her that it is too late now, we will go back there in the morning.

I know this is very difficult to deal with. My mom has no idea this is her home. It used to be part of her sundowning behavior when it first started about six months ago, but now it is every day, all day. It is heartbreaking to watch.
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Thinking of the childhood home as HOME is a typical theme with dementia. At least your Mom knows she moved, mine always wanted to GO home! The one suggestion I have is to 'go with the flow'. For the example you offered, 'Yes Mom, the truck got delayed but we are going to have everything we wanted'. This is a perfect example of how the loss of short term memory will work for you. She may ask that same question again, but it usually won't be related to your response, it will just be a 'dementia' loop where she gets struck on a specific point." Between these boards and the alzheimer's site (alz . org) there are so many Great ideas of how to handle. One suggestion, don't tell your Mom that she is wrong or that her perception isn't reality. To her, it is. so, go with it, whatever it is! Good luck on your journey.
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If it's just that one incident, I wouldn't sweat it.
But, if there's a bunch of really crazy stuff, or if she gets sort of angry or violent, then I would suspect a urinary tract infection.
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