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Three years ago he was diagnosed with dementia. He was put on medication and seemed pretty content with his surroundings. He lives with us, in the same house but pretty independent as he has all his amenities. Three weeks or so ago, he has been deteriorating rapidly to where he sleeps most of the time and is very obsessed about a 'certain' money he has misplaced, or doesn't know if he or 'someone else' put in the bank... etc..He has money put away and doesn't know where. His gp has ordered blood test to underline any physical problems before his psychiatrist takes over to see what further help can be given him. Does this mean he is getting worse to the point of no return? or is there anything else that can be done to help him have a better quality of life...

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Vitamin B12 can be life saving. I had a friend who had a difficency in his 30s and was completely disabled until his family took him to a different doc and got him on B12. He's back to work, feeling fine and working as a DJ and is well known - mentally back to health.
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Maybe get his vitamin D levels checked.
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It sounds like a UTI to me. My mother has not regained her faculties since the last UTI was followed by a TIA, but mostly she knows all of us, she bathes and dresses herself and takes care of her own toileting after the UTI was resolved. Before that, she slept, couldn't remember how to turn on the water in the shower and had fits of forgetfulness (she still has those, but they are different) and she was always looking for her purse Now it seems to be much better. She is taking her supplements, keeping awake days and doing some activities. The UTI thing is just the pits. Mother has her ups and downs. She gets relatives and their relationship to each other scrambled and talks to me as though I'm somebody else and she is talking about me. This comes and goes. Lots of cranberry juice (the real kind, not the cocktail or the "fake" cranberry juice that is really just apple juice mixed with some cranberry flavoring. If it's a UTI, expect some recovery.
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I agree with all of the answers above. I've found that with Alzheimers (my mom is 92 and in the severe - end stage) the disease progresses with plateaus, then a decline and then that becomes their norm for awhile until another decline..... Once a skill is lost (like being incontinent or being unable to feed themselves) it is usually gone for good. Once in a great while they have a good day and seem to be getting better but this is usually followed by a decline. I take these bright spots as gifts from God, but I don't expect it to last. It is a dreadful disease for everyone concerned.
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Yes, he is getting worse, but without you saying he cannot talk, walk, or have any other health issues, he probably has years before he actually dies. This disease takes a long time to do its damage. Hang in there and wait for test results just in case there is an underlying condition. I know what it's like to have a loved one with dementia trying to find something. Just let them keep looking...
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Both of these posts are right on and Sunnygirl has good suggestions to deal with his inquiries.

My mom gets worse in the winter OCT-MAR and it's seasonal. This is a pattern I've noticed over the last 4 yrs. she spends more time isolated in the house, sleeping, eats less, etc. the isolation and blending of sleep and wake time is more blurred leading to more instances of delusions, paranoia, etc.

She refuses all meds and probably couldn't manage taking them anyway so she seems to get bad and then when spring and summer comes, she gets better.
That said, her dementia, delusions, paranoia and outbursts have increasingly worsened over time in that they are more frequent and her stubbornness is longer lived over issues.

I've observed with my mom that dementia is tricky and different in everyone but their are universal behaviors which you've described. My mom was always stubborn, selfish and had a mean streak and these have only become more pronounced as she has aged. On the other hand, I've met many with ALZ and dementia who have "a happy soul" and they remain pleasant and happy over the small things well into elder yrs and even with their dementia, though they can become fretful and anxious --but more easily calmed.
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I have witnessed my loved one, who has dementia, go through similar phases. Her sleeping a lot during the day went away when she got on Cymbalta, an antidepressant. She also would insist on things like her purse was stolen or her roommate was doing this or that, but that stopped too when she started on her antidepressant. We checked, but she did not have a UTI.

You're doing the right thing to get your dad checked out for infections. I hope your psychiatrist can help with some med for his other symptoms. What I don't know is if these symptoms will eventually return. I know that losing communication skills is a phase that the dementia patient will eventually go through and at some point, it will not return. I know that one day she will not stay awake much and that will eventually be her norm.

I intend to look for guidance on this from the Memory Care staff where my loved one is living. I see other residents who are hardly ever awake, but they are gotten up and put in their chair everyday. They are not lying in bed all day. They are moved around, talked to and stimulated. I'm not sure why this is important, but apparently is it.

With regard to the delusions. While they last, I would try to redirect them. Such as NOT trying to convince him he's wrong. Just respond with things like, I bet that item will turn up. We can look for it later. Or you may tell him you find the money and put it in the bank for safe keeping. Say anything to calm his mind. He won't likely recall what has been said the next day so you may have to remind him over and over as if he hasn't said it before.
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It's good that you called his Dr. Your FIL could have a UTI which could account for the sudden change in mental status. An infection will show up in his blood test.

If there is no infection and this is the course of the dementia then a psychiatrist can prescribe something that might make your FIL more comfortable.

If not an infection, his new mental status could be his new baseline but wait to hear from the Dr. first before worrying too much.
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