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I'm not sure what her answer would be and even if she would remember the conversation five minutes after we had it.  It was just something we were thinking about as she never wears the button that would alert the staff should she need help and she is having ever increasing trouble moving around.
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Reply to FriendlyNE
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I put some in-home security cameras in my dad's house (where I was also living) when my father was having regular home nurse visits, and I wanted to be able to monitor the shared rooms in the house in case of emergency. I think as long as it is discussed and respect is given to any privacy wishes, then remote in-home cameras are a great caregiving tool.
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Reply to AliBoBali
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home camera supervision be integrated with Xfinity who will sell and install up to three cameras in the home and maintain video for two weeks after an event One can communicate via your smart phones. $25 per month service fee.
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Reply to rayppseet
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I used cameras with my mother's permission to monitor her in the common/central room of the house and a ring doorbell while I was working at the office. I also used a monitored security system with text message alerts on her bedroom and bathroom doors. It was the compromise when my mother didn't like having a companion in the house with her. It worked well and we will use them again when/if my mother recovers enough from a recent fall to stay alone again.
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Reply to TNtechie
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I used two cameras for about 6 months, with my mother-in-law's permission. One in the bedroom and one in the living room (360 camera, so I could see the kitchen, hallway and living room). It allowed my MIL to stay in her independent living unit for an extra 6 months. It alerted me to falls (I'd get alerts as to sudden movements) so I could get help to her even though I was 2000 miles away. I knew how she was sleeping and getting around. Everyone knew about the cameras, and they were in locations that did not cause legal concerns (i.e., the bathrooms).

The cameras also showed me exactly when we had to consider a different living situation - it literally showed me her first sundowning incident, her sudden inability to sleep and unwillingness to go to bed, etc. We had to get 24/7 caregivers within days of seeing the sudden change in behavior, and we moved her to our area into memory care as 24/7 caregivers was prohibitive in cost.

We had no regrets using the cameras and we had her permission to put the cameras in. It allowed her a few extra months of independence and provided me some peace of mind as to her safety. It also showed me immediately when we had a problem and provided empirical evidence to support the change in her care.

We do not use the cameras right now in memory care, but we aren't prohibited from doing so. We are considering putting the cameras back in due to concerns about the care at the facility, but are waiting until after our next meeting with management.

Are you considering cameras? Is your loved one amenable to putting cameras in?
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Reply to RebeccaCP
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