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So, we have a man who we adopted into our family years ago. So he is my "adopted brother".


He has had a second stroke and has only been out of the hospital a week. Before this he wanted to take care of business because he was worried about his future. So he gave me DPOA. We have moved him into a rental house on the property to assist him, and be there for him. He has a house two hours away, but he cannot go live there anymore due to his new condition. He has a lease until October. I was wondering if it is possible for me to get him out of his lease because of the recent medical situation. Hoping someone has an idea to advise me, I am going to call tomorrow and speak to his landlord, so I am trying to prepare for it.


Thank you.


I am sorry I did not know for certain what to post this under

Find Care & Housing
I spoke with the real estate people today. The lady was very helpful and very understanding. Although they wont let him out of the lease, she said now was perfect timing for them to get it rented quickly. Which hopefully will mean he will only have to pay one more month.
I gave his 30 day notice and she asked if she could go ahead and put it back on the market, I said yes please, the sooner the better.
I am getting everything together to go move his belongings ( a 4 hour trip)and at the same time completing some things on the house he will be living in.
So much to do and I will be glad when it is done.
Thank you all for your responses, this case is closed. :)
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Reply to smeshque
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Isthisrealyreal Jun 19, 2019
Good news it will rent quickly.
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Read the contract. He may have put a deposit down. Generally an early move out means loss of the deposit
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Reply to MACinCT
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It wouldn't hurt to get a doctor's written notice that this person cannot live by himself or whatever the reason may be.

I had a friend who got out of a lease because she couldn't walk up the stairs. Doctor's notice said that her arthritis was not good and navigating those stairs were not good for this condition.
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Reply to MAYDAY
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I would say your best bet is to try to work with the landlord. Most landlord's don't like to lose money, however I've heard of cases where they are fine with letting people go. That's usually when they are certain they can rent the apartment right away. In all likelihood, he might be better off trying to sublet and seeking to procure a tenant on his own. Landlord's don't want to do the work if they don't have to, they would prefer that you remain responsible for the rent unless and until you can find a suitable tenant. That means placing advertisements in newspapers, online, and in supermarkets, etc. and running credit checks, and securing proper security deposits. Make the place as presentable as possible, fresh paint, clean as a whistle, and even a touch of warmth. Be prepared to play up what a nice place to live it is and hide anything that may be a deterrent. Make sure it smells fresh and clean. This is usually your best bet. Landlords won't fight you under these circumstances, but they're not going to lose money just to be a "nice guy about it."
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Reply to Mikkimball0664
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Isthisrealyreal Jun 19, 2019
Mikki, subletting is usually not allowed.
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Thank you for the information, I will see what I can do for him.
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Reply to smeshque
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From my understanding medical conditions that stop you from living alone are reasons to let you out of a lease.

I would tell the landlord that he is a danger to himself living alone and he doesn't have the money to pay for the term of his lease and live with assistance.

Send a letter that says the same thing and that the letter is notice to vacate the premises. Do this return receipt.

Is there any way to find out when the house is rented or leased out? This would be important if the landlord tries to enforce the entire lease payment. They can only recover actual lost income, so if you notify him that as of July 1st or June 25th that your brother will be completely gone and he rents it out August 1st then he only lost 1 month, if there wasn't a deposit. Is that clear as mud?

My experience has been that individual landlords are easier than corporations to deal with, corporations forget they are dealing with people and unpredictable life.
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worriedinCali Jun 18, 2019
Again it all depends on state law. A medical reason is not grounds for breaking a lease in all 50 states.
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It depends on the terms of the lease and the applicable laws in that state, as the law varies from state to state. Some states DO NOT allow you to break a lease because of medical reasons (unless the medical reason was caused by living there), if his lease is in one of those states then hopefully the landlord will work with you on this.0
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