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Struggles with bathing, cooking and remembering. What assistive technology would help her?

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In terms of bathing, what sort of struggles is she experiencing ?
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Could it be the medication? Is she taking it as scheduled? Bi-polar and dementia are two different things. Forgetting cooking can be dangerous, my mother-in-law would turn the flames too high and start fires. Not bathing is moderate to late stage dementia. I would want a full neurological work up with brain imaging. I would be taking her on tours of Assisted Living facilities. Don't wait until this becomes a tragedy.
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I've written an article for long term care dependents at infolongtermcare on how video game neuro racer improves the memory of seniors, people with alzheimer and other cognitive impairment. You can check it here: www.infolongtermcare.org/iltc-news/video-game-neuroracer-improves-memory-of-seniors/

If you are her caregiver, then you could use these tips as well:
www.infolongtermcare.org/5-useful-caregiving-tips-for-parents-with-memory-loss/

Good luck
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Unfortunately, my Mom is bipolar. I was never aware of the exact problem until I was diagnosed with Asperger's and my therapist found out from another family member who observed Mom's behavior. I had lived with and suffered Mom's abuse for several decades because I had nowhere else to go. However, we faithfully worked out situations for at least 36 years; only the more recent 2 years have been my hardest when my Mom got older, suffered several falls at home and she had to be moved into a care facility. Two years ago, I lost my last permanent job, magnifying my stress even further. I have been seeing my therapist for nearly six months to help me cope better.
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Website AbleData is an excellent resource for all things assistive technology. They have a database of more than 26,000 products, including some DIY options. You can browse by activity, such as bathing or memory aids. The database includes everything from reachers and grabbers to apps and alert systems. Off the top of my head, I would look for reminder apps (medication reminders, ADL reminders), schedulers, bathing products.
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Being bipolar is no different than not having bipolar disorder when it relates to dementia. If you forget things like ADLs, then this person needs another person to help them remember. It can be home health aide, or moving into a memory care unit of a facility. You are not giving us much information about this person so I would need more. Forgetting ADLs (activities of daily living) is cause for concern and this person needs to be evaluated by a neurologist to determine the extent of the dementia. My PET brain scan shows I have a smaller grey matter mass with bipolar disorder and at 65 yrs. I am forgetting things, but not ADLs. I write things down I have to remember to free up my already clogged computer brain for tasks most important to caring for my dementia husband. Please have this person see a professional for evaluation soon. Best wishes!
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In this world we live in, we have so many options that weren't here 20 or 30 years ago. Awesome.
1. Purchase a large digital clock that gives the day and date.
2. Use a preset timer that is a reminder of when to take meds, eat meals etc.
3. 3" X 5" cards with none to subtle hints as to when to do things. i.e.: one note on the mirror above the bathroom sink with a reminder to brush teeth. A note as a reminder to take a shower in the morning when she gets up. etc.
4. There are plenty of microwavable meals that do not require refrigeration that would be easy to heat just by pushing a button on the microwave.
5. I keep a nice big desk pad type calendar on the frig to write the important dates. i.e.: Dr. appointment, Church service, family birthdays, beauty shop appt., etc.
6. If she pays her own bills, be sure to have a bin into which she puts the bills needing to be paid. That way you can peek into it to see where you can help.
I hope this helps some.
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Also, see the "Elder Care" tab on this website. Lots of good links.
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That's a broad question, but when I Googled "Assistive technology Alzheimers," there were a lot of hits. Here's one that seems useful: http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=109
You might also call a local Assisted Living facility, ask who does their occupational therapy (it's often an outside company that sends OTs/PTs), and then ask THEM what resources they use -- they could perhaps steer you to a website or catalog. Bless you for your caregiving.
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