Follow
Share
"Medicare typically doesn't pay for in-home caregivers for personal care or housekeeping if that's the only care you need. Medicare may pay for short-term caregivers if you also need medical care to recover from surgery, an illness, or an injury.Jul 16, 2020"

Medicare only pays for homecare when you have been discharged from a hospital or rehab. Once the person improves with PT or the reason for in home service is considered done, the client gets discharged. Any aides provided are done at that point too.

Now if you have a Medicare Advantage policy, they may pay for an aide. The Philly stations here are always advertising that MA policies may supply an aide. If Mom has an Advantage plan, you need to call them. Your other choice may be Medicaid in home. But then Mom needs to fit a certain criteria.

It would be hard to find an agency who will send someone for just bathing. I was lucky I got a woman thru church so Mom knew her. She was an aide on the morning school bus. Came over after her run and did Mom.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

Have you tried any of the no rinse bath and shampoo products?   They're a lot safer than full immersion bathing.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to GardenArtist
Report

Another issue is whether mother really does need baths 2 or 3 times a week. Probably not. A shower once a week, and sponging on other days is probably quite enough to keep her clean. If you don’t have a shower, look for a shower hose that attaches to the bath, that she can use while sitting in a shower chair (preferably one with an open bottom area that can be cleaned from below). Perhaps a transfer stool can help her to move across above the bath, which copes with the drain issue.

It’s more difficult if your upstairs bathroom doesn’t have a floor drain, but you can do the same thing down stairs – anywhere with water and a floor drain. Think outside the obvious – you may have something that will work for you both!
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to MargaretMcKen
Report

Speaking from my experience with my elders who use original Medicare Insurance, This benefit fell within the Part B portion of original Medicare where when the elder is homebound, needing LESS than full time skilled nursing care (such as help with their pill planners, etc., monitoring status of CHF or dementia etc.) AND the Elder couldn’t leave home without help...considered homebound, they would then qualify for a CNA for baths.
The home health agency will guide you through this and get a doctors order from your doctor for whichever services are needed and covered. the patient has to have seen the doctor face to face prior to starting home health. (could have been 180 days prior or up to 30 days after .. Telemed visits qualify). Or you can call her doctor and ask for a home health evaluation.
They won’t just send a CNA to give baths unless the elder qualifies for HH. Now again, this is traditional Medicare under Part B. Part A is the HH that covers patients after a hospitalization and is usually for a shorter time frame.
Medicare Advantage plans have HH as well but I’m not sure about the details. Whichever HH you speak with will help you determine if they take your moms insurance.
If your mom is on community Medicaid then I believe she qualifies for even more help. Do some research online for whichever insurance plan she has and what it covers.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to 97yroldmom
Report

Medicare pays for a nurse for like a hour if the doctor prescribes it. They generally don't pay for a caregiver though.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to Lvnsm1826
Report

It depends. Medicare will pay for some aide care a few hours a week usually if your mother's doctor says it's necessary. Some private insurances will pay as well.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to BurntCaregiver
Report
JoAnn29 Mar 17, 2021
0
(0)
Report
Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter