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My friend is on Medicare and he pays Humana for supplemental insurance his caregiver is putting down the full amount of hours aloud but only spending 2 hours a week at my friends.

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Sendme2help, I understand what you are saying. That's why proof needs to be looked for. It's possible that the caregiver is running errands or something because the friend told her to. But then again, it's possible that she's cheating the friend, the insurance company and the government. Getting the facts is always important before accusing people. With caregiving, it can be especially tricky since expectations can vary. It's important to give the accused person a way to explain.

It's troubling either way.
Carol
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Contact the person who hired the caregiver and/or the person or company who pays her.
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Putting down more hours than actually worked to cheat the senior is only one scenario. With Medicaid (and other plans), your mother is allotted a certain number of hours, and if not billed for, she can lose those hours. I don't know any honest caregiver that does not work above and beyond the allotted hours for less pay under IHSS, so check with the caregiver about what else is performed such as errands, shopping and give the caregiver a chance to explain.
Then, by all means, hire another caregiver that will only bill the actual hours worked at that pay, and only bill the hours present at the senior's home, and see what happens to your mom's 'needed hours' allowed by Medicare/Medicaid.
Many won't have a clue about what I am talking about because I am not talking about fraud. It is just common sense between you, your mom, and the caretaker.
Because, what are you going to do when the next week the caregiver is needed to stay an extra hour, and she says, No, I will not be paid for that.
It is foolish to be penny wise and pound foolish. This means, accountability over a longer time period than an hour, day, or week. Consider if the job is getting done
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I would think the person would need to sign off that the person was there for the time they say they were. We did this with the aide where I worked.
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I would call Humana, if they are the ones paying for care.
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Scott, if you are listening to her call in her hours, how do you know which patients she is calling in for? She may see 4 patients a day, not just him.
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When I worked in Elder Care I had to make a daily accounting of what we had done, how many hours I had worked, etc in a daily log book. I also had to call my co every work day and report my hours, so there were 2 sources to check on us. The co. could ask for the log book at any time, and the family was supposed to sign the book everyday..they never did, so we just operated on a trust system. OFTEN I did work for my clients AFTER hours, meaning, I would stop on my way home and get things they needed for the next day and they were not actually with me. We still were 'on the clock' those times. I'd be pretty careful about accusing someone of fraud unless you know all the circumstances. My client would be too tired to go grocery shop and I would go, then come back and put stuff away. That could easily add 2 hrs to a day. Or I did alterations to her clothing at home--again, I was being paid. I personally kept scrupulous logs b/c I needed that job. BUT, elder care is notoriously fraught with people who aren't being honest, so get your facts before you say anything. It is a rewarding profession, but sadly, caregivers are
very underpaid.
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How do you know this? To make this kind of accusation you should have proof, then follow Eyerishlass's advice.

You can also report it to Humana and Medicare as fraud.
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Oh well, I am probably wrong.
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what is wrong with asking her up front- no good to call they pretty much stick together- I have seen a lot worse and best thing to do is not to care about it at all you have your own problems
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