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Dad has Parkinson’s. Late stage. Sits a lot.

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Bedsores are ALWAYS serious. Get a wound care doctor involved now.

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000740.htm

The issue to start with is getting pressure off the area where the bedsore is forming. Roho cushions are great for wheelchairs.
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dads1caregiver Mar 30, 2019
I agree with Barb. A wound specialist needs to check out sores. My dad sits in a wheelchair most of the day. A sore developed & I took action immediately by taking him to the doctor. A Roho cushion was ordered & a cream was given. Dad would scream when I applied the cream. I used an OTC recipe I found on a cancer website for sores. It is: Combine 3 equal parts of hydrocortisone cream (1% or more), A&D ointment (or generic) and liquid anti-acid (like Maylox or a generic).
My dad's sore healed pretty fast & he didn't scream when this cream was applied. Dad now sits on a Roho cushion & no other sores have developed. As far as bandages, I used large square pads & the brown self-adherent tape that doesn't tear the skin. But, the sore healed faster by not covering it. For Dad, he stayed in bed a few extra hours & sat in a different chair until the Roho cushion was delivered. Tylenol helped with the pain. I ordered a mattress topper with alternating air pockets for his bed. Dad likes it a lot & expresses discomfort if I forget to turn it on before he lays down.
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I second the ROHO cushion, my wheelchair dependent mom didn't have any more problems after getting hers.
As for dressings - a lot of people on the forum have mentioned colloidal silver or medical honey, but I agree with BarbBrooklyn that this isn't a do it yourself project, the wound you see is only the tip of the iceberg and much of the damaged tissue will be deep below the surface, that's why seemingly small wounds take so long to heal.
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cetude Mar 28, 2019
Small wounds require daily dressing changes, and they heal slowly because tissues are extremely thin. She is also insulin dependent diabetic, so I keep her sugars as manageable as possible. Sitting on the wound does not help matters..but the do eventually heal up but it requires daily dressing changes..somtimes several times a day. My mom's wounds always occur due to scratching herself, even after trimming nails close to the skin as possible. I can see the scratch marks when she does present an open wound. Nevertheless once there it's back to daily dressing changes for about two weeks (it generally takes that long). I've been living with this for several years now..it would heal beautifully and sometimes I'm free of it for months..then BOOM she would scratch scratch scratch to satisfy an itch and it's back to daily dressing changes.

As for her food, I have to give her a high amount of sugary foods such as ice cream with protein shakes because otherwise she will refuse to eat. She is at that stage she forgot how to swallow and requires a considerable amount of coaxing. Despite all of this I manage to get her to take in nutrition, and her sugars are well managed.
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A good thick cushion and when he's lying in bed, he's got to be turned regurly, skin will start breaking down from pressure.
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Depends on the size of the wound but my absolute favorite is Medline MSC3222Z Sterile Bordered Gauze, 2" x 2" . The adhesive sticks to the skin just right, but not too aggressively. It's the only dressing I will use. I NEVER use paper tape since that will break the skin. Actually you really NEED to see a doctor for instructions because it's impossible to show you on this forum. He may order home health and the nurse will teach you.

My mom sometimes gets sores due to scratching. She loves to scratch her skin. when something opens I can see the scratch marks..nevertheless it requires daily dressing changes..sometimes more often. Once the skin is broken you can't use creams anymore but daily dressing changes. When the skin is intact, Benadryl cream helps but not always. I just learn to live with it. Sometimes she gets no sores for months and months then she stratches herself open..it's back to dressings again. I do keep her nails as short as humanly possible..but that's difficult too. I often use Mankua honey with the dressing changes. othertimes I use prescription Bactoban 2% on the dressing.
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NeedHelpWithMom Mar 28, 2019
cetude, wonder if she has itching from allergies of some sort.
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not an expert but just to mention there are products of interest at a place I believe is called the wound care shop on line. I love a tape they make called Kind by 3M that does not stick to hair. Saved my dad because the world class 2nd highest rated hospital didn't have someone with enough common sense to realize you shouldn't use duct tape (slight exageration) to hold an IV line on a 99 year olds hairy arm and then have a 2nd moronic nurse who thinks you should just rip it off.
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Ng78580 Mar 28, 2019
Ughhh i can say a couple of things abt this. Hospitals hve the worst nurses n rns
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If there is no wound I would not use a bandage I would use zinc cream and gently clean the area daily. Using a pillow I would also shift the person’s position as much as frequently as possible to relieve the pressure point. You can tell the pressure area because it will be a little red. You have to watch it everyday because the skin is more fragile than before. Medicare will cover a wound care nurse visit if necessary.
If you want to really use a bandage look into Mepilex.
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As NG5780 has pointed out, MediHoney is great and keeps bedsores at bay. Also, an Adermal Pad cushions the bedsores, and that works well too. If you don't want to move the person every two hours, take some pillows and make sure their bottom is not flat on the bed. You may need to have rails (with covering so the person does not catch an arm or a leg) on the bed to make sure the person does not fall out. Just keep alert and watchful and you can handle it.

To check on whether the bedsore is serious, press it with a finger. If it comes up
white, it's ok. If it stays red, get nursing assistance, as that is a blister or near-blister that needs professional nursing.
All the best
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Reply to BritishCarer
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Home health nurses used Duoderm and they worked very well, Also use a barrier cream. Home health nurse ordered it but she said diaper cream works too. They also suggested mom sit on a cushion which she uses daily now too. She is also supposed to get up and walk around every hour. She doesn't always do that. She gets up to use the bathroom but it is a bedside commode so she really isn't walking very far. Sensi Care is the cream. Or as our nurse recommended here, don't laugh at the name, can be ordered online, Boudreaux's Butt Paste.
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cetude Mar 28, 2019
When the wound has opened you can no longer use any kind of paste, but requires daily dressing changes and it must be changed daily..sometimes a few times a day due to bathroom wiping. I use either Mankua honey or bactroban oinment (prescription) or a combination of both with the dressing. Never use zinc or other barrier creams with open wounds--the wound will get worse. My mom gets butt sores due to scratching herself. Never fails.
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I used one I found at CVS for ???? $5 for five bandaids? Kinda expensive, but less than elsewhere. It’s a large rectangle, sticky edges, light see-through cover to go over sore.

Once its washed and you put the cream on it, try to be careful and leave it on all day. Change it at night, or once a day. Do use a pillow - I used to change its position about every 2hours - left, right, back, & no pillow. Be super diligent & good luck!
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Duoderm to reddened areas along with proper positioning.
I am not sure if you need a prescription for Duoderm but I used it in home care as prevention if I saw a reddened area.
Duoderm comes in a sheet form; you can cut areas to fit over the skin. In my experience it does adhere pretty well to clean, dry skin and the adhesive side holds pretty well. You can change it every 3 days or when it begins to come off.
This is only for intact skin- not if and when the tissue breaks down. Then it’s time for woundcare center assessment.
Good luck!
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Pepita48 Mar 29, 2019
Yes, I find Duoderm hydrocolloid plaster very effective in protecting the skin. I also use it for broken skin and successfully on Stage 1 and 2 bedsores, as it absorbs the liquid from the wound yet keeps it moist and promotes healing. But I agree, it's good to get a doctor's opinion as well if the sore develops. My own doctor said that to properly heal a bedsore, you do need to keep the pressure off it and allow the blood to circulate in the skin. It takes time, but it does work.
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