Some bad financial decisions have left my dad deeply in debt. I'm his Power of Attorney, but he gets angry when I try to guide him financially. The POA seems useless. How can I help him? - AgingCare.com

Some bad financial decisions have left my dad deeply in debt. I'm his Power of Attorney, but he gets angry when I try to guide him financially. The POA seems useless. How can I help him?

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Dad met a woman that drained him financially after mom died. It only took 4 years for him to run through all of their retirement. The friend kicked him out and sent him to me with $20 in his pocket. It has been a nightmare unraveling his financial issues. He is in elderly housing, but he currently has bills he can't pay. Dad gets angry when I try to guide him financially, yet the POA seems useless at times. I can't stop him from creating debit. Am I missjng something?

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You aren't missing something. Even though you have POA (and you should), he may resent you trying to tell him what to do. You are his "kid!" He may feel guilty about what happened in the past or that he is blamed.

A third party often has better luck as they are not emotionally attached with all the baggage that goes along with it. You want to see if a friend of his could help out, or get a financial person to lend a hand. It's quite possible he would cooperate better, then. Good luck,
Carol
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Get a lawyer; you may need a guardianship, and maybe there is some possibility of suing the phony female friend who took advantage of him. Take a look at http://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=18705, http://www.seniorsummit.ca.gov/materials/betty_malks.pdf, and/or Google "successful lawsuit elderly financial abuse." This is unfortunately not uncommon and results in destitution and even impacts health and lifespan for the victims.
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