I'm going to the neurologist soon for the first time with Mom. Anything we can do to make the visit worth our time?

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I have written many symptoms out and given them to mom's PCP. I plan to give them to the neuro as well. Hoping to get a diagnosis, if even a general dementia or alzheimer's one. Coming from a specialist seems like it would hold a bit more weight. I suspect vascular dementia, frontotemporal, or alzheimers. I know they may not bother to try to get specific, but just want a specialist to give their input as she has been closed to meds for depression, anxiety, memory loss (which is her choice, but seems like a diagnosis MAY at least help her see her need for living in the assisted living facility, though reason often doesn't work either). Anyone have suggestions for this visit? I live in a different state so I hope I can get a better idea what we are really dealing with while I'm visiting so the assisted living facility and I know how to support her better. I know that there are no miracle cures for dementia/alzheimers, but would like to get a diagnosis.

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What Pamstegman said. I'd also suggest taking notes because you're probably going to be hit with a lot of information that's difficult to take in all at once. You should also bring along a list of questions that you want answered, as sometimes it's hard to recall everything you wanted to ask until after the appointment is over and you're walking to the parking lot.
Your mom will probably need several tests and you may not get a diagnosis right away. Even when there is a diagnosis, you mom may not accept it, or remember it, and she may still be resistant to moving to an assisted living facility. Good luck.
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Deedee, what Pam outlines is correct. In my mom's case, she had already had mri eith contrst due to a suspected stroke, so the neuropsych workup eas a physical exam, mental status exam, neuro exam and a two hour session of cognitive testing. My mom, who only had mild cognitive decline at that point (we had already moved her to ind. Living) would not have been open to hearing or understanding anything vomplex about what she should or shouldn't do. Do uou have poa, hipaa documents in place?
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The first visit is to collect history, so have a record of all illnesses and surgeries, bloodwork, test results, for her lifetime, which is no small task. Also a complete record of medications, adverse reactions, immunizations, births, anaesthesias used---- all of it.
You can expect the Neurologist will want an MRI with contrast and possibly an EEG, even some memory and association tests. The results of these will be gone over at the second visit, along with possible options for care. If the MD recommends you seek Guardianship, or if you ask and get a positive answer, proceed in that direction.
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