If a person has 3 POA's, do all three have to agree before a decision is made?

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3 daughters have P.O.A. one is a user and a greedy person, always has been, does not have mom's best interest at heart. Talked mom into adding her on P.O.A.

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puddlejumper, each individual can act on their own accord unless the POA document states differently or if the bank has to have more than one signature on a check. The problems come in when one POA does not agree with what another POA does. It can get messy. I agree with Jeanne that the POA should be changed. The best arrangement could be one POA and one alternate to serve if the primary POA is not available.

Being a POA is not fun if there is a good bit of work. Some parents are afraid of showing favoritism in assigning POAs, so we end up with situations like this.
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Unless the POA says otherwise, yes. (Unless one is primary and others are secondary.)

Multiple co-POAs is a disaster, in my opinion -- even when they all have Mom's best interest at heart.

Mom can change the POA, is she is still competent. Does she see that this is an untenable situation?
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