Mother in nursing facility and developed an open wound in sacrum. What are the implications of this wound? - AgingCare.com

Mother in nursing facility and developed an open wound in sacrum. What are the implications of this wound?

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Mother is very ill and developed an open wound in the sacrum. The facility has put a patch on it. My mother is in terrible pain and has been given pain medications, but she has said the pain is unbearable. Everyone at the facility is aware of the situation and has been treating her. Has anyone had experience with this type of wound?

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She also needs - a lot of nutrition - for the wound to heal. Get her to hospital ASAP for an evaluation, even if you have to call 911 for the transport. She needs a wound nurse - now. Medicare pays for a pressure mattress if patient qualifies. Ask the hospital social worker about this.
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Thank you all for your responses. It is a great help to me for you to share your experiences. I am so grateful!
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Wound care needs to be done by special wound care nurses. I would ask to have her sent to the hospital to be evaluated. The mattress mentioned is an air mattress and should have been given her a soon as there was a pressure point.
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My mom has never had an open wound however she did develop a red patch related to pressure when her alternating pressure pad malfunctioned. ( If you don't have one for your mom, you should purchase...ours was about $80 on Amazon) It took one night to get the spot and 3 weeks to make it go away.

We had to get a new pump for her pad. We moved her position every 1-2 hours (day and night), kept the area clean, dry, and coated with cream. It take work and diligence to keep skin issues away and even more to clear them up when they occur.

I am sure your mom is in such pain. Sorry she is going through this.
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Yes, it sounds like a bedsore. My mother suffered a brain hemorrhage many years ago and was bed bound for 6 months, after a long coma. They didn't turn her often enough in the hospital and she developped a terrible 4th stage sacrum bedsore. It was so deep it looked impossible to heal, but it did. It took more than one year and countless different therapies, trials, mistakes and a couple of infections but it healed, completely.
I can't recommend a therapy as I'm not a doctor and it depends on many factors, but I can tell you what really did help:
* turning her every 2 hours, night and day (I know)
* getting rid of the 48 hrs patches and change the medication twice a day
* washing and rinsing the wound with a hand shower (sic!)
* getting rid of diapers and even underwear, which can often become dump and can lead to infections
* eating more and starting walking (this was vital!)

I know how terrible it looks and how anxious you must feel. I do feel for you, and for your mom, but hang in there, they can heal completely, almost against what looks possible.
One last thing: I eventually took my mother home against all doctors opinions, the type of care you need for this type of situations is unfortunately just possible at home, with a team of people helping you (a doctor, a nurse, a physiotherapist etc).

Sending you lots of strength and courage.
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It sounds like a bedsore. She should be having wound care. There are also special mattresses that can be used to keep the pressure off the sore. They turn the patient from side to side by inflating one side and deflating the other on a regular basis.

My sister who died last year after six months on and off (mostly on) in the ICU had a terrible bedsore on her sacrum at the time she died and for most of the last few months. They are terribly painful and it interfered with her treatment for her other issues because she couldn't tolerate being placed on her back for imaging tests, etc. Bedsores can become infected and result in sepsis. People occasionally die from the infection that results, although that was not my sister's cause of death.

Bottom line, talk to your mother's medical providers and make sure they do everything possible to treat the sore and alleviate her pain. They should be turning her regularly and using medicated salve on it, among other things.
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Is Hospice involved? I can understand your concern. I'd be too. I don't have any information about this. I hope you can gets some responses here from those who have dealt with it. What does the doctor say?
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