My mom has started developing bedsores. Any ideas?

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My mom is almost 92 and in the final stage of Alz. She is completely bed bound, cannot move on her own, incontinent and non-verbal. She has started developing bedsores, the worst is on her butt, but now has one on her hip and starting to get them on her heels. We try to change her position as much as possible but she is in pain on her side and always falls back to lying on her back. We are using patches, med.ointment, position changing and keeping her clean and dry. She also seems to have trouble breathing on her side as she winds up getting face down on the mattress or pillow - we use props to keep her in place but again she still winds up face down. We are using an air pillow to relieve the stress on her butt, but now she is developing sores on her hips (lying on her side) and on her heels. She cannot move her arms or legs so we do that for but her joints are freezing up. Any ideas of what we can do to help her? Her nutrition is poor as she no longer wants to eat, so we keep her hydrated with home-made smoothies (yogurt, fruit, juice and her meds) as this is something she will take. Does anyone have any ideas of what else we can do for her? She is at home under hospice care.

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I have used some squares of mesh with a foam bandage over the top. NO ointment with bedsores per the wound care center. You cut out the metal, I think it's copper but will find out for sure, to the size of the wound and apply the bandage over the top with the thickest part over the wound. You leave it there for 3-4 days and then change the metal piece and bandage. It's important it doesn't get wet. I'll get you the name of the metal product and bandages. This really works for us and I hope you'll give it a try. After the 2nd or 3rd application, sores should be healed. You might ask hospice about wound care and see if they can get someone in there to evaluate the sores. Praying you try it and it works for your mom. 🌻
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It sounds like she may actually need a pressure relieving mattress. Even if you can't get insurance to cover one for you, you can still go to places like Walmart and get her one of those nice 4 inch or more thick memory foam mattress toppers. They're more expensive but well worth it. In fact, you'd be surprised to hear this, but earlier in the year, a friend of mine actually found one on the curb in pretty good shape, and it was clean. It came from a house where the people seem to be pretty well-to-do because the quiet neighborhood where I live is a pretty nice one. If you ever want to find something for nothing, go curbside shopping in the good neighborhoods because you never know when someone will actually toss something, especially from a college house. 

Getting bedsores to heal

Getting bedsores to heal requires restoring circulation and for the open wounds, making sure they stay clean and dry. If bedsores are just starting, the best time to catch them is early. The earlier the better. Don't let them get infected, and definitely don't let them get too deep! If the bedsore is a pretty bad one, your best to have the patient admitted to the hospital so the pros can take care of this. If you can take the patient by car, you can save a ton in transport but make sure you tell the receptionist and your intake nurses that you need a thick enough mattress to actually conform to the patient so that it acts as a pressure relieving mattress if this is in the ER. With enough patience speaking up about gurney mattresses that are too thin and cause even more problems on an already existing underlying problem such as arthritis and in your case, bedsores among other things, we can raise awareness and make "backboards" and "yoga mats" a thing of the past. I'm glad some hospitals are actually listening, because if you yourself have never been on some of the gurneys out there, it's very hard to understand what the some specific types of patients are going through if you yourself have never been in their shoes and if you yourself have never been on some of the nightmare gurneys and even some of the exam tables and some of the rooms at some of the hospitals or doctors offices. A hard table or gurney actually intensifies and already pre-existing problem whereas thicker mattress of about 4 to 5 inches or more lessen the pressures on the  body, especially in certain specific areas like hips, backsides and shoulders. These are actually some of the most common areas to get a bedsore or even trigger pressure induced arthritis pain that radiates deep into the joint and sometimes beyond. 

Another thing to help with preventing and even healing bedsores is to pay special attention to reposition patients more often. It's nice if a patient can reposition themselves if you give them one of those overhead things they used to use in hospitals that has a grab bar with reposition assist. If the patient can't re-position themselves, then someone needs to go in and turn them every so often but this should be done with the help of an assistant or two so that it goes more smoothly. In fact, there's  even a new type of bed that does the turning for you with the push of a button by an assistant. I'm not sure if they're out on the market just yet, but anything new I heard usually starts in California and works its way across the US. You might want to look into this type of bed, it looks like they may be very beneficial. If they are not yet available, they may still be in development and testing mode.  Modern technology is beneficial for not just lifting and transferring patients, but also for helping with those who are bedbound since they also need just as much help as anyone else. Not turning the patient often enough causes bedsores if they're left in the same position long enough to start developing even the warning signs of bedsores when they can't reposition themselves turn themselves. The problem is quickly enhanced if the patient is without a pressure relieving mattress. Years ago even I had to start using a pressure relieving mattress because I not only had pressure point problems, but also my body was misaligned allowing urine to not get to my bladder in the night, which would cause my kidneys to hurt, which would wake me up. As soon as I got up, the urine immediately dropped to my  got up, the urine immediately dropped to my bladder. The Tempur-pedic bed I sleep on actually helps with this particular problem as well as pressure point pain and even arthritis/bursitis
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My 97 yr old Mom recently developed bedsores on her heels and just above the butt. CURE:sheepskin heel cups and a massaging bed layer. I forgot what cream was used, prescribed by hospice and/or her doctor, but they were cured within 1 -2 weeks.
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Bed sores or pressure ulcers are caused by the blood supply being restricted to areas of the body. I beg to differ about the constant repositioning. It used to be the practice to gently massage the area when the patient was repositioned but this seems to have fallen out of favor. There are all kinds of special boots available at great expense to keep the heels safe.

If you take the pressure off the affected area it will allow the blood to return to that area and help prevent further breakdown. 

Hospital beds and alternate pressure mattresses can be helpful but sometimes at the end of life there is no way of preventing them. There are dressings whose name escapes me right now that can be placed over the sore to aid healing. They work by encouraging the dead tissue to slough off and healthy tissue to form underneath. I have seen bedsores even on the ears that were in no way due to a neglectful caregiver.

Some people will yell "Call a lawyer" if their loved one in a nursing home developes bed sores. I say "Not so fast" First find out if your loved one has been receiving proper care. This does include getting out of bed but not being left sitting in a chair in the same position all day or waiting hours for a diaper to be changed. 

Spend 24 hours with your loved one and you will soon discover the type of care they are receiving.
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Home Health And Hospice nurses will keep track of her skin conditions and address the bed sores. They also will bring in a hospital bed with a air mattress that regulates air flow on one side, then the other. All this is covered by Medicare. Talk to your momsdoctor first about the skin issues and he will write out an order for Home Health And Hospice, hospital bed, and air mattress, etc. Regular beds, constant repositioning, etc. does not help bed sores.
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Gma1954 is right. Also there is something called GeoMatt that is a little better than egg crate and sheepskin, and alternating air mattress overlay if you can get one is good idea too. The poor nutritional status probably without enough protein on board is a big contributor to this. You have to turn often, even quarter turns, to let blood flow get to different parts of the skin and if that is not enough, then you really are nearing the end. There is even a term for this - Kennedy terminal ulcers. See www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478915/. It sounds very much like you are giving her the best care you can.
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At the end of life there is often little you can do to prevent bedsores so don't feel you have been neglectful if your loved one does develop some despite your best efforts.
The circulation begins to slow and does not reach areas where there is pressure, and deprived of a good blood supply the tissue begins to die. I have seen sores even on noses and ears! Your hospice nurse should be on top of this so follow her advice.
Real sheepskin is wonderful but unfortunately can't be cleaned. The synthetic stuff is pretty worthless you need the natural oils from the sheepskin.
I have seen lawyers looking for business state that bedsores are always a sign of neglect. Not true they can happen with the best of care. As someone mentioned they do take a long time to heal. Make sure the patient is not suffering pain from the sores or other causes. I would rather be pain free and sleepy than suffering. So if hospice offers medication use what ever you feel comfortable with for your loved one.
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My mother used a sheep skin for my grandmother.
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Hospice should be taking care of the treatments for the bedsores and they can teach you how to do the dressings etc. He should have a special air mattress. Floating heels to reduce pressure is an excellent idea. Perhaps they can give your mom some ensure/ pro-mod ( for protein supplement), and Vitamin C and zinc. All of these things are usually indicated when someone has bedsores.
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Hospice should provide the heel protectors. But with a pressure sore the only thing that I was advised to do was "float the heels" Not sure what to do with the back and hips.
Can you ask if the mattress can be changed to one with alternating air chambers. This will take the pressure off all areas for a short period of time as the chambers empty and the fill.
Hospice should provide all the covers that are necessary as well as any ointments.
At some point I think the sores are inevitable as the body can not heal itself well enough to keep up with the decline. The body is working as hard as it can keeping the heart, lungs and brain functioning. the skin takes a back seat to "the important stuff". the pressure sore that my husband had/has on his heels took a long time to get better, one is gone the other getting better but this is after almost a month. The body just does not heal fast enough to keep up.
These are not your fault! Even with the best of care I think they can not be prevented completely.
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