Can I still keep my house if mom goes into a nursing home?

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Hello,
I started out as a care giver for my father in 1997 when he had severe dementia, at that time my mother could not take care of him alone and asked me to quit my job and help take care of him. She promised to give me their home (which I've lived in all my life) as a show of gratitude.
I cared for my father until he passed away, then as fate would have it my mothers health started to decline so I went from taking care of my father to taking care of my mother.
My mother and her attorney signed the house over to me in may of 2008. I've been faithfully taking care of my 85 year old mother but a few weeks ago she was diagonosed with dementia. The last few weeks have been absolutely terrible for me because my mother has been suffering from hallucinations and restlessness through out the night. Just a few nights ago I was awakened at 3am to smoke alarms sounding. My mother had gotten out of bed during the night and turned every burner on the stove up to high, then she had unlocked and opened all the doors entering the house. I was petrified over this because she could have burned down the house killing herself, me and my 18 year old son or some violent intruder could have easily walked right into the home since all the doors were opened.

I'm sorry for all the back-story but my question is,

If I feel that I can no longer care for my mother and put her into a nursing home, will medicaid still take the house from me because five years have not passed? I have not worked a job since 1997 because I've been giving my life to take care of both parents and now I'm worried that me and my 18 year old son would be left homeless. I live in the state of Georgia if thats helpful.

I would be most gracious to everyone that can advise me. Thank you.

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yes, have seen that happen many times; the house across from where son - dad's grandson - used to live before he moved in with dad - went up for sale - that he'd said he'd like to have - for that reason - and I was going to see about getting it for him - when I began to learn more about the POA I had of dad's; it wouldn't let me do real estate/property transactions
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debdaughter, in Kentucky, once the patient is in a nursing home for six months, the house becomes subject to collection. If the spouse is still in the home, or a disabled child lives there, no estate recovery is made.
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what if the house wasn't quit claimed to the family caregiver?
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In my state, CT, there is a different look back period (2 years instead of 5) for the family caregiver whose only residence has been the house that was the parent's but has been given (quit claim) to the family caregiver. Although since then I think even the 5 year look back has been lessened.

Check with your local area agency on aging for other help to supplement hospice.
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I know this is late but hospice is a good option for that; we brought my dad home on it
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This question is from 2012, I think the patient is long gone.
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I am very disappointed that no one suggested for you to take your mother to her family doctor for a good ol' round of antibiotics. ANY infection in an elderly person will trigger the symptoms you describe: hallucinations, paranoid fear etc., etc. etc. I knew a sweet, cheerful man in his 60s who suddenly started babbling, stripped naked and became combative. It was a UTI (urinary tract infection).
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from what I understand Raine to say, hospice will be coming into the home; a friend of mine went through that just yesterday; brought her mil home to her (the mil's) own house with hospice
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From my understanding or in my case hospice would probably be the best route to take and ultimately it is going to happen. My problem is I'm a male and it's my mother that needs changing and bathing. Even if I could it would be hard, I say could because I have a very bad back and can't lift much weight. Changing and bathing is the only thing keeping her from coming home, hospice would pay for someone to come in and do that, I think.
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Raine, this is wonderful. Your doctor had the perfect solution. We should have thought about Hospice. I called them in when my father was dying. They accept Medicare as complete payment. Yea! Are they going to keep her at their facility?
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