I want to make an "all you need to know" binder for my elderly parents and home health nurses. Any suggestions?

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So, I have this idea and I need help. I want to make a binder for each of my parents with everything they need to know about anything - something they can reference instead of relying on the internet (scary place for old folks). Also it would be something for their home health nurses to reference when they take them out for appointments, etc. I want it to include pouches for insurance cards, copies of insurance cards, copies of SS cards, copies of health policies, car insurance policy, numbers for lawn care, numbers for errand services, numbers for adult day services, numbers for snow removal, copy of lease agreement, budget sheet, tax preparation checklist, etc. Anything you can think of that you'd want your loved one to be able to reference easily and conveniently, please respond! I think this will solve a lot of confusion issues. I can always tell my mom and dad and their nurses to "check the binder in section _______, it should have everything you need to know, and come ask me if you can't find it." I'd also make myself one so I can reference anything they're looking for. (can you tell I'm an organization nut?)

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I have just emailed DodoPad about this thread.

For those who have yet to come across them, DodoPads are the original-and-best "diary-doodle-memo-message-engagement-organiser-calendar" books. Some decades into production, they branched out into address books, gardeners' yearbooks, wedding planners, baby journals and the rest of it.

But no caregivers' aid, not yet. I will let you know what they say.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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freqflyer: That's spot on accurate! Oftentimes, computers will frustrate the elder so much because they may starting clicking icons that takes them into a "never-never land" of confusion. That can happen to someone younger, too. Sometimes I will, with one keystroke, lose everything I've just typed.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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I know it's incredibly sad, but FF has just put her finger on it, for me.

A binder is a GREAT idea. Don't be surprised or, worse, hurt if it sits forlornly on the shelf.

Goodness, I've still got a box full of them. The cardiology clinic, the Alzheimers Society, my community healthcare team... everyone had a helpful binder to give us.

Being a handwritten-or-you-don't-really-care person, my "binder" was a series of Moleskine exercise books. Px's, appointments, journal, key contacts, ICE information, memoranda - all in there.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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My Dad use to write computer code going way back to DOS, FORTRAN, COBOL but as he aged he found it more difficult to use his computer. Two main issues, not remembering his passwords even though he had them written down somewhere, and issues with aging eyes. He had the letters on his screen SO BIG it looked like the top letter on an eye chart.

My Mom stopped using the computer because of the arthritic hands, and also because of her eye sight.

Back when I was learning 30 years ago this new machine called a "personal computer" I was able to learn quickly because of my Dad. And when the Internet became popular it took me awhile to learn what were legit websites and what were snake oil websites. This is something one can't learn in a few weeks.

The binder I had for my parents with questions to fill out, it remained mostly blank. Dad did paste an advertisement of the funeral home he wanted to use, from his home town newspaper.
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Reply to freqflyer
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People who are older can use the internet too. They don't need people acting like they can't use the internet. Maybe some people just need help figuring it out. Then they could learn how to look things up.
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Reply to Francisca
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I would also include a list of all allergies. And for drug allergies, if you know of alternate meds that can be safely taken. For instance I'm allergic to Percocet but can take Lortab.
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Reply to mistyanne7
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That's a great idea. You could probably make it easy on yourself by creating a document on the computer that can be updated as needed (I am not implying that your parents go on the computer).
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Reply to Llamalover47
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Add a copy of their marriage certificate & copy any P.O.A. papers so that anyone will be able to see right away who speaks for them if they can't themselves

Place phone numbers family & friends you might need to contact
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Reply to moecam
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I just "googled" the Springwell Resource Caregiver Notebook.
WOW it has a lot of great info. Detailed, concise,
Thank you for sharing this info. I will pass it on to the Support Groups that I attend.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Along with the list of medications and dosages, I included color pictures of what each pill looks like. This booklet I made included people who mom could call if she needed and help or a ride somewhere. Names of doctors, dentist, eye doctor and their numbers. When I went away on vacation, I would include a detailed list of who was coming to help and scheduled senior van rides to the nursing home to visit dad.
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Reply to lynina2
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