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My mom just wants to sleep all the time and says shes weak and really tired. She says she just wants to go to sleep and she seems more confused, lost and depressed more days than not. Shes lonely. My brother moved her in a camper with him.

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Evaluation for Hospice is a great suggestion.
Not only will you get help but supplies and equipment that might be needed.
My Husband was on Hospice for over 3 years.
As long as there is a documented, continued decline the patient can remain on Hospice.
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VeggieG - Best check your facts before telling others incorrect information. Here is a quote from Medicare... (you can verify by going to www.medicare.gov)

Who's eligible?

You can get hospice care if you have Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) AND meet all of these conditions:

Your hospice doctor and your regular doctor or nurse practitioner (if you have one) certify that you’re terminally ill (you're expected to live 6 months or less).
You accept palliative care (for comfort) instead of care to cure your illness.
You sign a statement choosing hospice care instead of other Medicare-covered treatments for your terminal illness and related conditions.
Only your hospice doctor and your regular doctor or nurse practitioner (if you have one) can certify that you’re terminally ill and have a life expectancy of 6 months or less.
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"Late-Stage Stage 7:
Very Severe Cognitive Decline (Late Dementia) People in this stage have essentially no ability to speak or communicate. They require assistance with most activities (e.g., using the toilet, eating). They often lose psychomotor skills, for example, the ability to walk. Average duration: 2.5 years"

Each type of dementia is different and within that each case is different.

My husband had Lewy Body Dementia, which does not follow the ALZ stages. The last day of his life he fed himself -- he never lost that ability -- and was communicative. He had a pretty chipper day, in fact.

What he did have toward the end was great sleepiness. I called in hospice when he started sleeping more than 20 hours per day.

Karenjane, I think an evaluation by hospice is a good step at this point. Even if you decide not to use that service or they decide she is not ready yet, the evaluation itself will be useful.
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Perhaps the camper is the underlying issue. Campers are generally close-quartered living conditions. Also, the materials they are constructed with often wreck havoc on an elder. My late mother actually pulled a bathroom door off a camper when she was visiting the person and broke her femur bone.
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Lovinghands2003~ hospice services are changing. You don't need to be in your last 6 months. It no longer means you will die. Some people go into hospice, but then they get better and "graduate." The criteria for dementia is pretty stringent, but other
comorbidities could make someone eligible, e.g. weight loss. It doesn't cost anything to have a hospice evaluation and as far as I know, most of the services are covered by Medicare.
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Karenjane - I don't mean to be a 'Debbie Downer' but Hospice care is only for those who's Doctor says they have less than 6 months to live. My dad is on Hospice care - Cancer. My mom has Alzheimer's which can last for 10 years or so. Unfortunately, there is currently not much support (financially) for Alzheimer's, but there are organizations that can give ideas of things that might help. Depression is VERY common with any type of Dementia. I would start with a Primary Care physician and see what they say.
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Definitely have a physical. She may do better with an anti-depressant, and if she's already taking one, it might not be right for her any more. Moving is very difficult for someone with dementia. Is she alone most of the time? Perhaps a companion or volunteer could come in and keep her engaged.
I agree with having a hospice evaluation, too. That can be a great help and doesn't require being actively dying. They would be better able to tell you where she's at. Best of luck!
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Karen Jane:

I am sorry to hear about your mother even though I don't know you or her. My mom went through this also before passing. I hate to say this, but have you contacted hospice in your area? Hospice has a bad name as everyone thinks it's just for the end of life; which in some cases it is. However, they also help the patient and the family with the journey, which may take years or just a few weeks. I wish I would have contacted them sooner. They were wonderful to my mom as well as my family. They not only took very good care of mom, they helped to educate us (the family) in understanding the journey that mom was on. Do your mom a favor by contacting them to come in and evaluate; they may tell you they're not needed yet but give you pointers in making your mother comfortable and helping you in understanding what she's going through. Good luck and prayers and thoughts are with you, your mother and your family.
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Sunny, I wondered the same thing. If this was a recent move, it might have been too much for her. And it depends whether they're in a campground with a lot of other people, or one that's more isolated.
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I"m sorry to hear your news Karenjane. But, I wonder if living in a camper would be feasible for someone who is late stage dementia. How do they handle heat, water, refrigeration, etc. ?
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Willie,

It’s very interesting... My mom went through it… lose psychomotor skills.
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Everyone is different, there are so many variables that come into play such as comorbidities and the type of dementia she has. With Alzheimer's there is often talk of Stages, healthcare workers also use the Palliative Performance Scale and the Clinical Frailty Scale to help them decide how far along someone may be. In the 7 Stage ALZ scale the final stage is described as:

"Late-Stage Stage 7:
Very Severe Cognitive Decline (Late Dementia) People in this stage have essentially no ability to speak or communicate. They require assistance with most activities (e.g., using the toilet, eating). They often lose psychomotor skills, for example, the ability to walk. Average duration: 2.5 years"
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