How can I be of assistance to my little old neighbor lady?

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We live in a rural area in the High Desert California. She is lonely, and called to ask me over. She is in her mid 80's I guess. Her daughter who recently succumbed to Cancer also had Hospice care. The hospice care, I guess is now not available. Her other daughter that lives about an hour away, recently asked me to keep an eye on mom. I agreed, gladly. Today is day 1, and she called me crying, because she is lonely. My concern is her becoming dependent on me. I live alone, and am not much at holding a very balanced conversation. I am unable to even be involved in my own mothers care. I'm simply not equipped to spend time with little old ladies. I like her now, and she likes me. I have heard her abusive outburst with other caregivers over the last 6-7 years, and just don't want to fall prey to that cycle. I know that there are outreach programs (ARC) in think is one of them, and they are trained, and equipped to help the elderly. Today, when she called, I simply suggested that she watch some TV, reassuring her that I am here if there is an emergency. I feel like a complete heel. Am I approaching this correctly/tactfully? Am I being a selfish jerk? I look forward to others opinions, and advice.

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jeff - this site has been a life saver, literally in a few cases, for many of us. There is a wealth of experience, ideas, concerns shared by, on the whole, very caring people. I am not sure how I would have gotten through the past few years without it. Not as well, for sure. You may want to point the daughter in our direction.
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Agreed golden 23. My Grandmother was cared for the last year of her life by Hospice, and I knew hospice is for terminal patients. I apologize for confusing the issue. Hospice is not really a factor in my original question. It was more meant as a, "What the heck have I gotten myself into, and How to get out of it tactfully" without hurting the lady in questions feelings.
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I am so thankful to have this medium available.
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Some older people are very stubborn and resist change of residence and even resist having home care. Like babalou, I am assuming that what the daughter is trying to arrange is home care as opposed to hospice which would indicate that the mum has a life threatening/shortening health condition. It sounds like daughter is very involved.

If mum actually does need hospice, I think most of us would agree that she should not be living alone.
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Babalou, I am in no way qualified to say this 91 year old is 6 months terminal, but I can say she rolls out those big 50 gallon garbage barrels by herself. She is very active, and gets around. Her daughter is absolutely making efforts at getting her mom properly cared for.
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Please, please understand that the daughter is doing an above, and beyond job at caring for her mother. She is doing everything a daughter could be expected to do, and is very involved.
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Jeff, I guess many of us are confused because Hospice is a caregiving program for those who are certified by their doctors as have less than 6 months to live. Someone who is ready for hospice should certainly not be living alone, I think!

I hope that what the daughter is doing is arranging someone to provide some caregiving and housekeeping for her mother several times a week.
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Holy smokes, if the old gal is ready for hospice there is no way she can continue to live there on her own. I realize the family has just been through a crisis, but what is this daughter thinking?!!
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UPDATE: I just got off the phone with the daughter, and we discussed everything mentioned here. By the way, I just found out she is 91, not mid 80's as earlier reported. golden23, the hospice care was for the daughter, and now that the daughter died the hospice care ended. The other daughter is working on getting mom cared for, hopefully by the same hospice caregiver, but they are unsure if she is available, meaning a new hospice caregiver will have to be introduced.
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jeff - very cautiously, setting good boundaries as the others have said. What the daughter wants and what the mother wants may be two different things.

I think it is important to let the daughter know what you are and are not prepared to do and have her convey that to the mother - or sit down with the two of them and make it clear. Mum wants to stay put in her home despite a good alternative. I agree you should do nothing to facilitate that or you will find yourself the caregiver. Your concern about her becoming dependent of you is a very realistic one. Losing a child is a huge life stress. She needs her own family to help her through this and the limitations of aging. I suspect she should not be living on her own so her daughter is going through what any here are - waiting for a crisis which forces the issue.

You mentioned that the daughter who died also had hospice care which is now not available in your area. How is that relevant?
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