Heart at 18% , diuretic not helping. Why?

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My father's echo test shows his heart function only 18%, we always know he has weak valve due to last attack more than 10 years ago. But for the past 2 years, his condition got worse. He is currently not able to walk due to swollen legs. He consumes diuretic pill (Lasix) but seems it's not helping. Is there any medication that need to be changed? Does he have options for other medical actions beside stem cell?

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Aadriana I am so very sorry for your loss.
Take comfort in the fact that you did all you could for him .
Thank you for updating us.
Both of you are in my prayers.
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I'm so sorry to hear about your dad!
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I'm so sorry for your loss. It sounds as though you were able to make your father comfortable, which I hope will be some consolation to look back on. Condolences to you and your family.
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I am sorry for your loss. Thank-you for sharing the update.
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Thank you so much for your care and response to my question. My father passed away yesterday, a week before his 68th birthday. It was tough as I really hope he could get better. Three day prior his departing, his swollen legs got smaller and weeping had stop. I thought we might have some chances here. But, God knows best for him and us. Thank you for all your responses, once again. It means alot to me
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I don’t think she is in the US. No mention of aortic valve condition as well. Adriana, can you ask his cardiologist what the echocardiogram test provided regarding his aortic valve? You mentioned something occurred 10 years ago to his valve at that time, may be that condition is now worsening. 
 
Agree it may be time to consider hospice. So sorry for you and your family. 
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18% was obtained by echocardiogram. He is essentially a cardiac cripple with low quality of life. He may or may not qualify for a TAVR procedure which will help the valve but not the cardiac muscle function. If he is seen at a quality heart facility and he has few options then perhaps it is time for hospice.
You mention stem cells. Does he live near such a facility that is doing this research? Can you and he afford to live near such a facility. Depending if he qualifies he would have a 50/50 chance of receiving the treatment.  Your profile also mentions stroke so he may not qualify
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Ask the cardiologist to do an echocardiogram; you should be able to get this test outside of the US,  it’s not invasive and like an ultrasound, can be done out patient. No need for hospitalization. They can determine aortic and tricuspid valve patency with this test (& EF).
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Ask the cardiologist to do an echocardiogram; you should be able to get this test- it’s not invasive and like an ultrasound, can be done out patient. No need for hospitalization.
The “weeping” in his legs is a very hard thing to care for. The bandages often fall off frequency.
If you are going to do that make sure you wash his legs with saline solution, rinse well, apply
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Aadriana, I'm sorry for the challenges your family is facing. I can literally "feel your pain" from your post. You've gotten excellent advice, especially from the medical professionals who post here. I only have a few comments.

1. Bumex is another diuretic. My nurse relative tells me that it expels retained fluid at a much higher rate than Lasix, which is more moderate. It would be up to the doctor to determine if this would be appropriate in your father's condition - it might not be.

I've seen it used twice. First time was after an operating team overinfused during pacemaker surgery and the second time was when a pleural effusion occurred. In both times Bumex was used to eliminate the excess fluid. And it worked, very successfully and quickly.

2. I'm not a medical person, so this is observational and anecdotal. My aunt eventually died rapidly after being diagnosed with lymphedema, which presents with fluid weeping from the body, in her case, her legs. She was in treatment, by home care medical people.

Her legs were wrapped as well, but in something more complicated which she described as like a hockey player's leg padding, restricting her movement and literally making her walking more difficult. However, she had been worried about this padding being sterilized and potentially introducing bacteria into her weeping legs. And I think her concern was valid. She died a few days later from sepsis.

The concern that I have in wrapping your father's legs is the sterility of the cotton, although the gauze might be sterile. Anything not sterile could introduce bacteria.

I'm not trying to scare or frighten you; but I would raise with a medical person the issue of wrapping the legs. There are swaddling treatments, but they need to be done very carefully.

And raising the legs is at least a first step, as well as cutting back on any food containing salt, although you indicate he's not eating much.
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