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My Mom recently had a stroke. She is alert and speaking although slowly and gets confused often. I've come up against limitations when I want to get health or financial information.

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When it comes to legal documents I would be very careful about doing them yourself.... one misplaced word or left out word could create a nightmare after the fact. Each State has different rules regarding witnesses, etc.
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I would act on this as soon as possible before her condition worsens, which would make it more difficult to get any kind of a POA in place.

Before going the route of an attorney, I would do some research on your own and see what kind of alternative options there are, like handling the legal documents yourself to help save costs.

Look over this Beginner's guide and see if it offers any useful advice legalnature/article-center/wills-trusts-and-estates/beginners-guide-to-estate-planning#what-is-a-healthcare-power-of-attorney
This article seems good too legalnature/article-center/durable-power-of-attorney/power-of-attorney-and-elderly-care
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If your mom is competent & cognitive, she can sign a DPOA & MPOA. You may need to call around to find an eider law atty who will come to the facility she is in (or her home) along with a notary to do this. You likely will need to have an initial appointment with the atty to go over moms situation as to what atty needs to get this done (like a letter from her MD that she is competent). Clearly ask either the atty of their paralegal what documents to bring to the initial meeting.

Really make an effort to visit with mom often & do whatever to get her motivated on any rehab too. The day before the atty visit try to have her go to the beauty shop so she presents as nice as possible too. Best of luck!
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